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Textspeak is all over the place.  Many of us use it daily to text friends or chat online but it seems to be popping up in more formal settings.  I can think of at least two companies which use ‘4u’ as part of their name. Not only this, I have seen writers using textspeak in trying to sell their books. Why would I buy a book when the promotional material or the synopsis isn’t even written in half way decent English. What does that say for the book I ask myself but am I being unkind? Perhaps there is a time and a place for textspeak so long as the more formal use of language is recognised and used appropriately.

Does the use of textspeak mean children don’t know how to write correctly, to spell and to argue coherently? That depends on who you ask.  The links below cite examples from both camps, surveys often say what the proposer wishes them to say. Phraseology of the question, target audience and other factors often determine outcome. There are several studies which seem to contradict one another. This perhaps says more about the nature of the surveys and research than the alleged degradation of grammar. Three of the links cited below are journalistic in nature and at least two contain typos so perhaps the standards are slipping anyway.

The first link below mentions a study sponsored by Mencap (the charity for people with learning disabilities) in which 500 parents and teachers were interviewed, two thirds of the teachers reported textspeak finding its way into homework and many parents having to find translations for cryptic messaging among their children.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationopinion/9966117/Text-speak-language-evolution-or-just-laziness.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/9432222/Texting-is-fostering-bad-grammar-and-spelling-researchers-claim.html

This is supported by an article from Psychology Today. http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/wired-success/201207/focroflol-is-texting-damaging-our-language-skills

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/social-media/9813109/Art-of-essay-writing-damaged-by-Twitter-and-Facebook-Cambridge-don-warns.html

Researchers at Penn State University found the standards of literacy declining due to the use of texting and the inability to grasp the basic rules of spelling and grammar concluding text messages were often incomprehensible.  Surely however because one individual does not understand does not make something incomprehensible and worthless. I don’t understand French but I do not claim it is incomprehensible to those people familiar with it.

Is this just the evolution of language or bad habit and laziness? Language does evolve and in contradiction to the evidence some  studies seem to argue there is no degradation in proper linguistic skills among those of us who text and use less formal online language.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9520111/Text-speak-does-not-affect-childrens-use-of-grammar-study.html

Evidence from Coventry University states, “There was no evidence of any significant relationships between poor grammar in text messages and their understanding of written or spoken grammar.”  This is supported by research by Kaplin Colleges International  who also cites the research from Coventry.  “Not only was there no evidence of a negative association between literacy skills and the tendency to use texting slang or abbreviations when using SMS, in fact it seemed to be adding value to the children’s conventional spelling abilities, because of the highly phonetic nature of the text abbreviations which are most commonly used.

“They seem to enable children to rehearse their understanding of how speech sounds map onto printed characters in a way that benefits their normal literacy development.”

Kaplin International Colleges claim that ‘63% of English learners do NOT believe text speak damages grammar or spelling’, despite it sometimes creeping into essay writing.

http://kaplaninternational.com/blog/grammar-spelling-text-speak-english-learners-073/

http://www.mobilephonesandsafety.co.uk/does-text-speak-affect-grammatical-ability.html

Facebook and Twitter often do not allow long posts so writing tends to be concise and abbreviated, this too may cause problems.  Yet it doesn’t have to. So long as a person knows when to use more established and formal language does it matter? Texting or chatting online is not the same as writing a book, a letter or promotional material.  Learning to write concisely is not necessarily bad.

Some of the studies previously mentioned claim, textspeak aside, young people and even some of the older folk among us are writing more now due to the ease of online communication. It may be true the art of letter writing with an ink pen and paper is in decline typing out a letter, email or other online correspondence is not. Anything which encourages literacy and communication is to be encouraged.

Language changes that much is certain, you need only compare Chaucer to Shakespeare to Lord of the Rings to the latest best seller to see how language, usage and even spelling has evolved and diverged in time. Is techspeak the next step? I really don’t know, part of me hopes not but part is fascinated by these changes in our language as our language has adapted in the past.

TEMPORA MUTANTUR, NOS ET MUTAMUR IN ILLIS.

http://www.teachthemenglish.com/tag/contrasting-views-on-the-effects-of-text-messaging-on-english-grammar/

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