Eclectica – Short Story Bundle – On Preorder Now

Eclectica A Short Story Bundle

On Preorder – available from 13th April 2019.

Eclectica bundle cover.jpg
From fantasy to space adventure, pirates, mystery, horror, historical fiction, romance and coming of age you’ll find short, snappy reads herein. There is something for everyone in this lucky dip.

19 short stories and collections from multiple authors.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NWQ4YTP/?tag=kydala-20

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07NWQ4YTP/?tag=kydala-20

https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/eclectica-1

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1458246383

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1131078746

https://bundlerabbit.com/b/eclectica

Blown – Diana Deverell

Socks and Pins and Aliens – Thea Hutcheson

Tales of Blood and Ink – Kate MacLeod

Tales of Tomorrow – Debbie Mumford

Shaken, Not Stirred: A Dawna Shepherd Short Story – Diana Deverell

City Shadows – Chuck Heintzelman

Outside the Walls – A.L. Butcher and Diana L. Wicker

Tales of an Altered Past Powered by Romance, Horror, and Steam – Donald J. Bingle

Dear Brother – Felicia Fredlund

The Cache and Other Stories – Sherry D Ramsey

Sword Oath – Jackie Keswick

The Hooded Man – Barbara G. Tarn

S F & H – Harvey Stanbrough

Resonant Bronze – J.M. Ney-Grimm

Hitomi’s Path – M.L. Buchman

Children – Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Jhyoti Planetside – Marcelle Dube

Petra and the Blue Goo – Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Tears and Crimson Velvet – A. L. Butcher



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Summer Smashwords Sale July 2018

It’s sizzling where I live – I am hoping for autumn to arrive quickly lest I melt to goo. But it’s good weather to laze with a book or seven. Smashwords are having a summer sale and I have entered some of my books. Check out the comments below for other books in the sale.

Running July 1-31st.

The Watcher – A Jack the Ripper Tale is free with code SS100

Shattered Mirror – A Poetry Collection is free with code SS100

Tales of Erana: Just One Mistake is free with code SS100

Outside the Walls is free with code SS100

The Light Beyond the Storm Book I is only $1.50 with code SSW50

The Shining Citadel is only $1.75 with code SSW50

The Stolen Tower is only $1.62 with code SSW50

And by my alter ego

Tales of the Golden Mask

 

 

Dirty Dozen Author Interview – Russ Crossley – Warrior Bundle #Sci-fi #Warriorbundle

Author name: Russ Crossley

Remembering Warriors is a commemorative Bundle – Why is it important to you to support these causes? In my family my father and my uncles fought in World War 2. I also have friends who served in Korea in the early fifties. I think we must do whatever we can to support those returning military veterans who were wounded during their time serving their country to honour them and thank them for their service and sacrifice on our behalf.

Do you have anyone you remember who was wounded or fought in war (either past or present)? A German V1 rocket wounded my father when he was stationed in England with the Royal Canadian Army prior to D Day in 1944. He recovered from his wounds in time to participate in the D Day operation. He served in the artillery.

*Please tell us about your publications.

What first prompted you to publish your work? I began writing fiction for sale over twenty years ago but never had any idea how to begin until I attended the Oregon Coast Professional Writers Master Class taught by award-winning professional authors and editors Dean Wesley Smith and Kristine Katherine Rusch. Kris and Dean taught me how to become a better writer and most importantly how the publishing process works and how to break in the business. I then started submitting to The Strange New Worlds writing contest sponsored by Pocket Books and was eventually accepted three times.

What have you found the most challenging part of the process? The overall experience of the traditional publishing process is very challenging to most beginners.

Are you a ‘pantser’ or a ‘plotter’? Very much a  “pantser’. I have tried plotting and found it doesn’t work for me. I enjoy being surprised by the direction the characters take the story. It makes for unexpected twists and turns, which I read for myself.

What piece of advice do you wish you’d had when you started your publishing journey? Trust yourself and don’t be too hard on yourself when you fail.

If you could have dinner with any literary character who would you choose, and what would you eat. Jack Reacher. I would eat a medium rare steak and salad.

What are your views on authors offering free books? Do you believe, as some do, that it demeans an author and his or her work? On a limited basis as a short-term promotion I have no problem with it. On a longer-term or permanent basis, I think this is foolish. I don’t think it demeans them or their work but it fails to recognize that publishing is a business as well as an art and that their work has value. Customers are willing and often want, to pay for this work if they see it has value. Writing is hard work and I feel we should be compensated for this work just like any other job.

What are your views on authors commenting on reviews? Don’t. Ever. Very bad idea.

How do you deal with bad reviews? I place very little weight on any reviews be they good or bad. They are individual opinions based on individual taste and personal biases. You can easily find all sorts of opinions about any art be it film, TV, books, plays, paintings etc. I mostly ignore them except for marketing purposes because I know some folks respond to good reviews.

Sort these into order of importance:

Great characters

Good plot

Awesome world-building

Technically perfect

How much research do you do for your work? What’s the wildest subject you’ve looked at? Currently I’m writing space opera set in the far future so I can pretty much make up whatever I like. But I have done considerable research for some previous projects to get certain details right. The wildest subject I looked at was You Tube videos on how to drive a school bus for a romantic comedy I wrote many years ago called Antique Virgin.

How influential is storytelling to our culture? Extremely important. Storytelling is everywhere on the news in newspapers and magazines. Advertising in every medium uses storytelling either from a static image or in television commercials. The web is a  huge source of storytelling most people don’t even think of as storytelling. Social media is storytelling. Texts, tweets, etc. are storytelling. Even when having a coffee with friends we use storytelling to share news and events. I think it’s what makes us human.

What’s the best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing? Write every day to exercise your mental muscles.

What’s the worst piece best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing? You must hire an agent to be a published author.

If you could be any fantasy/mythical or legendary person/creature what would you be and why? Superman. His role as super hero is far more complicated than it appears on the surface. His powers make him capable of solving most of our earthly problems I find the possibilities very exciting.

Tell us about your latest piece? I am working on Blaster Squad 6 Galaxy of Evil. It is the sixth book in this action/adventure space opera series set in the year 4154. Blaster Squad accepts a mission to stop a powerful enemy force of mercenaries from capturing a strategically important planet. The stakes are extremely high and the action extremely intense.

What’s your next writing adventure? Blaster Squad 7 will conclude the current story line.

What is the last book you’ve read? Dark Matter by Blake Crouch.

Is this the age of the e-book? Are bricks and mortar bookshops in decline? I don’t think so, at least for now. The majority of readers read both eBooks and paper books in the present time. I expect at some point this will shift to more eBooks than paper but we’re not there yet. I do think online stores are becoming a bigger threat to brick and mortar stores than eBooks.

With the influx of indie authors do you think this is the future of storytelling? Even traditional publishers and agents troll the indie authors for new talent so yes I do tend to think indie authors are creative and are bringing originality to the craft of storytelling. And Indies are bringing back some genres the publishing “experts” thought were dead and gone.

Are indie/ self-published authors viewed with scepticism or wariness by readers? Why is this? I think this is lessening over time as more and more readers discover new authors and entertaining original work. I do think indie authors have to up the professionalism of their work with great covers and properly edited and copyedited books. I would, however, stress to readers if you discover mistakes in indie books but love the story cut the author some slack. Any book no matter who publishes it or who edits it tries to present their best work possible. And writing is HARD work.

Is there a message in your books? Love your family and respect those who are different you.

How important is writing to you? I love story and always have. Creating my own worlds has been an exciting and satisfying journey that continues for the foreseeable future.

Links http://www.53rdstreetpublishing.com

Bio: International selling Star Trek author, Russ Crossley writes science fiction and fantasy, and mystery/suspense. Over his more than 20 year career, he has published 18 novels and almost 100 short stories.

His latest science fiction satire set in the far future, Revenge of the Lushites, is a sequel to Attack of the Lushites. Both titles are available in e-book and trade paperback.

He has sold several short stories that have appeared in anthologies from various publishers including; WMG Publishing, Pocket Books, 53rd Street Publishing, Sapphire Blue Publishing, Champagne Books, and St. Martins Press.

He is a member of SF Canada and is past president of the Greater Vancouver Chapter of Romance Writers of America. He is also an alumni of the Oregon Coast Professional Fiction Writers Master Class taught by award winning author/editors, Kristine Katherine Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith.

Feel free to contact him on Facebook, Twitter, or his website http://www.russcrossley.com.  He loves to hear from readers

Warriors boxset

 

Russ’s short story collection features in Remembering Warriors.

https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/total-war

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/b/remembering-warriors

Kobo http://bit.ly/2k26wGv

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2BGnSQB

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2AdOEmT

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2zWnKMt

I books http://apple.co/2BFldqf

Russ Crossley cover

Returning Author – Tori Zigler

I’d like to welcome back author Victoria Zigler, or Tori, if you prefer.

Please recap briefly about your books:

Most of my books are fantasy stories, fairy tales, animal stories, or some combination of those, but I’ve also written books in other genres too.  Regardless of genre though, my stories are aimed at children.  I happen to know that some adults have really enjoyed them too, however, and I’m not just talking about adults who are family members or friends either.

Not all my books are children’s stories.  I also write poetry, which is generally suitable for any age level, and has also been enjoyed by adults and children alike.

Plus, I have a fantasy story published in the “Wyrd Worlds II” anthology.

What has changed since you last visited? Tell us your news!

The last time I was interviewed on here, I was about to release the final book in my “Kero’s World” series, and had ”Vinnie The Vegetarian Zombie” due for release the following month.  Since those titles came out, I’ve published another 14 titles.  Two are poetry books, four are the books for my “Zeena Dragon Fae” series, and the others are more stand alone stories.  My most recent releases are a poetry collection called “The Ocean’s Lullaby And Other Poems” which was released in early July, and my first ever science fiction story “Jeffrey The Orange Alien” which was released in late August.

Also, at the time my last interview went live, I was only doing my books as eBooks, but now I have them all available as paperbacks too.  The eBooks are still published via Smashwords, and distributed to all eBook retailers Smashwords distributes to (such as Barnes & Noble, Apple iBooks, Kobo, etc) so are available in multiple formats to work across a variety of eReaders and other devices.  The paperbacks are published via CreateSpace, and distributed to all the retailers CreateSpace distributes to (such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc).

Do you think indie/self-published authors are viewed differently to traditionally published authors? Why do you think this might be?

Yes, I do.  For some reason, people got it in to their heads that self-published translated in to “not good enough to be published” – despite the fact that there are many reasons why a traditional publisher might not want to publish something, and most of those reasons have nothing to do with the quality of the work in question.  Unfortunately, the fact that some self-published authors put their work out in to the world before it’s really ready (in other words, before it’s been properly edited, proof read, etc) has led to some poor quality work being on the market, which has only served to encourage this view.  Opinions are starting to be swayed by some self-published authors who have managed to make it big, and show the world that a self-published book can be as good as a traditionally published one for quality, but I think it’s going to be a while before everyone is willing to accept this new viewpoint – if they ever do.

Do you read work by self-published authors?

Yes, I do.  I also accept books from them in exchange for posting a review.  Personally, I don’t care how an author has published their work.  If it sounds like a book I’ll enjoy, I’ll read it whether it’s self-published or traditionally published.  I use the same criteria for deciding if I want to read a book regardless of the publication method, and don’t give the method of publication a single thought when rating or reviewing a book.

What are your opinions about authors commenting on reviews? How important are reviews?

Reviews are very important.  They’re useful for authors sometimes, because some contain helpful information on what an author could have done to improve the story, which can potentially help to improve the author’s next piece of writing.  However, reviews are mostly important for other potential readers, since they tell those readers that someone has read the book, and give some insight in to what they thought about it.

Authors can “like” a review, or thank a reviewer for a good review, if they really insist on interacting with reviews.  But that’s it.  An author should NEVER comment on negative reviews, especially not to disagree with the reviewer.  By all means read them, and privately take note of any constructive criticism contained in them, but don’t comment.

What are your views on authors reviewing other authors?

I don’t see anything wrong with author’s reviewing work by other authors.  I’m an author, but I was a reader first, and the same is true for all authors, which means there’s no reason an author can’t assume the role of an average reader while enjoying the work of another author.  Plus, it’s a bit silly to exclude someone from being allowed to review a book just because they’ve written one of their own.  As long as an author leaves an honest review, and isn’t leaving a good review on the work of another author just in hopes of getting one in return, or leaving a bad review because they got a bad review from that author, there’s no problem.  I mean, there’s nothing wrong with author’s doing review swaps, as long as they’re done with the understanding that the review should be an honest one based on your opinion of the book in question, rather than one based on how good or bad the review the other author gave you was, if you know what I mean.

I quite often review books, and rate those I don’t review.  Whether I’ve just picked up a book randomly, or have been given a copy by the author or publisher (or both, in the case of most self-published books) in exchange for a review, I always try to be honest in my reviews and ratings, whether the author has reviewed my book(s) or not, and regardless of how good or bad any review the author left for me was.

Looking back what do you wish you’d known when you started writing?

Since I started writing as soon as I learned how to, I don’t think there’s anything.  Honestly, I don’t remember much from the time before I started writing for pleasure, since I learned to read and write early, and was quick to learn the pleasure of writing.  Plus, I think you learn more about writing by actually doing it, and never stop learning.

Although, if you mean before I started writing professionally – in other words, before I started publishing my books back in 2012 – the answer is different.  The thing I wish I’d known then was that an already established online presence would help my writing career, rather than hinder it.  I’m not really sure why I got it in to my head that continuing to blog would take too much time away from my writing.  After all, I’d been blogging regularly – usually at least once a day – for about six years when I published my first book, and had been doing plenty of writing in that time, even if I wasn’t mentioning most of it on my blog.  But I became convinced for some reason that if I wanted to make a career out of writing, I should stop blogging publicly.  I still kept my blog, and posted a few things on it with it set to “private” just for my own benefit, but I stopped allowing others to see my posts, and stopped visiting the blogs of my friends.  Huge mistake! Not only did it cost me several really good friends – friends who I miss, because they were a great group of people – but it also meant I lost several potential opportunities for sales, as well as potential people who might have helped me to spread the word about my books.  I only had my blog private for about a year, but that year was enough time for me to lose touch with most of the people who had been regular readers and commenters on my blog, most of whom still don’t appear to realize I’m blogging again, even though I’ve been doing so for around three years, and am doing so on my original blog, which I’ve now made public again.  I’m trying to reconnect with as many of the people as I can.  Not just for the potential networking opportunities, but also because I miss them.  Unfortunately, success on this front has been limited.  In short, the choice to stop blogging publicly was a bad one, which I regret, both from a personal and professional point of view, and if I’d known then what I know now, I never would have even considered stepping away from the blogging world.

Do you have any unpublished novels under the bed/in a folder anywhere which you thought were awesome at the time, but now will never see the light of day?

Nope.  I mean, I did have some stories that were… Well, let’s just say they needed a lot of work.  I also had several poems that needed a little work.  But I hated to see them go to waste, so I took the time to rewrite them, and later edited and published them.  All I have unpublished now – that I have copies of, anyway – are poems I’ve written since my last poetry collection was published (which will go in my next one) and the stories I’m in the process of writing.  There were probably others that I didn’t get to re-write, but no copies of them exist anymore, since they’ve been lost in moves and computer crashes, and I don’t think it counts if the only record of them is a vague memory I have of having written other stories and poems.

How have you progressed as a writer since you started?

Since, as I said when answering a previous question, I was really young when I started writing, I would hope I’ve progressed a lot.  I know my grammar skills have improved, I’ve learned more about sentence structure, I’ve learned about different poetry styles and tried a couple of them out, etc… All the stuff you learn as you progress with education.  Beyond that, I’ve learned not to assume that because I know something my reader will.  In my early stories, I often assumed I didn’t need to describe things because I knew what they were, but I now know descriptions are important, and not everyone will recognize even some everyday items I take for granted, since different places have different names for some of them, and others aren’t actually available in other countries.  Luckily, I learned about this before starting to publish, so have done my best to take this in to consideration in my re-writes, as well as in my newer stories.

What aspect of writing do you least enjoy? Why might this be?

When it comes to the actual writing process, there’s nothing I don’t enjoy.  I enjoy research too, since I enjoy learning about different things, and if it wasn’t a topic I was interested in I wouldn’t be writing about it, which would mean I wouldn’t be researching it.  The only part about being an author I don’t enjoy very much is the marketing.  Don’t get me wrong, I love connecting with my readers on social media and such, but I hate the part where I have to spend ages doing the posts that are essentially just different ways of saying “please buy my book.”  Unfortunately, since I want to be able to share my stories with the world, I have to do that part as well as the writing and research.  I try to focus more on finding interesting things to share and post about, as well as interacting with others in places where I might get sales, rather than actually posting “please buy my book” type messages, which makes the marketing stuff a bit more fun.  It’s probably more fun for potential readers that way too.  At least, I hope it is.

Most authors like to read, what have you recently finished reading? Did you enjoy it?

The last book I finished reading was a children’s story by a fellow self-published author.  The book’s title was “Oh Grandad!” and the author’s name was Stephanie Dagg.  It was, as I said in the short review I put up for it on Smashwords, an amusing and fun read.  Actually, all the stories I’ve read by Stephanie Dagg have been entertaining and enjoyable reads.

Do you have a favourite movie?

“Practical Magic” and “The Craft” are my favourite movies.  However, I’ve been a bit obsessed with the movie “Frozen” since I first saw it towards the end of last year, so I might have to add that one as a third favourite from now on.

What are your plans for the future? When will we see your next book?  Tell us about it.

I’ve got my first ever historical fiction story due out in October, which is a story based on the Battle Of Hastings.  I’ve already written several new poems towards my next poetry collection, so I’ll hopefully have a new poetry collection out next year too.  I’m also working on a couple of other stories, one of which is a Christmas story involving a giant, the others I can’t tell you more about just yet, because I don’t know much myself; I’m a pantser, and I’ve not long started working on them, so right now I don’t know exactly where they’re going, nor even exactly which genre they’ll all be in as it stands at the moment.  Like I said, I rarely know much at this stage myself.  One time, for example, I had a story I thought was going to be a mystery, only for it to turn out to be a fantasy.  Anyway, I’m not yet certain what the future holds beyond that.

If you had to pick five books to have on an island which five would you pick?

I’d rather not be limited on my choice of books, but if I had to pick, I’d want “A Little Princess” by Frances Hodgeson Burnett, “Matilda” by Roald Dahl, “Strings” by David Estes, “The Complete Sherlock Holmes” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and something that will be useful for telling me how to survive while waiting to be rescued.  Either those five books, or just that last one, plus my Kindle and some kind of solar powered charger, that way I could have the time to read all the books waiting on it for me to read them.

How do you think fantasy is portrayed in the media?

Though it’s not always the case, for the most part, from what I’ve read and watched, fantasy is generally portrayed as being a mostly male dominated genre, with vicious dragons and weak women making regular appearances, while mighty men rush in to save the day.  I want to see more vegetarian dragons and strong female characters, maybe with some men needing to be the ones rescued for a change.  Not just in children’s books and movies, but in general.

 

Links etc.

Website: http://www.zigler.co.uk

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/toriz

Facebook author page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Victoria-Zigler/424999294215717

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/victoriazigler

Blog: http://ziglernews.blogspot.co.uk

Back Catalogue 5 – Tales of Erana Interview

Originally published here: http://www.jeffreycollyer.com/#!Author-Interview-AL-Butcher-Tales-of-Erana-Myths-and-Legends/dr2ze/55b8f04a0cf27acb2d8bddd2

Today I talk to A.L. Butcher, author of the collection of short stories, Tales of Erana:Myths and Legends.

 A. L. Butcher is the British author of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles fantasy series, the Tales of Erana series, and several short stories in the fantasy and fantasy romance genres. She is an avid reader and creator of worlds, a poet and a dreamer. When she is grounded in the real world she likes science, natural history, history

 and monkeys. Her work has been described as ‘dark and gritty’ and her poetry as evocative.

 A.L. what made you decide to publish a novel?

 The short stories came from lore and legends created for the world of my novels. They are mythic in style – similar to fairy tales or old-style legends. The original idea for the characters and world came from a mix of an idea I’d had for a while for a fantasy/mythic world and a character I had for a roleplaying game. Put simply I had a head filled with stories which wanted to be born.

Where do you get your inspiration to write?

 Everywhere. Nature, history, myths, and things I read and see. I tend to get bursts of inspiration at the most inconvenient times, like in the bath or at work.

 If you could pick just one phrase from your writings to preserve for future generations, what would it be?

 Magic has its price and that price was war. Other tribes coveted the Relic, gift of the Lady of the Sky, and so fought the tribes of the Jagged Peaks, staining the rock with blood and even poisoning the streams. In the infancy of the world the mortal races were young and foolish. Some remained so.

 Why have you chosen this collection for your spotlight?

 I think the Tales of Erana series is a great way to highlight the world of Erana. I love myths and lore; these focus on the magic, the legends and other more minor characters in the world. I’d love to get more people to read and listen to the Tales of Erana, they are short tales and can easily be read over a lunch break or on the train so are a good introduction both to the fantasy genre and the setting. The lyrical prose reflects a time of fireside storytelling and great heroes.

The novels are more…adult and unsuitable for younger readers.

 

Where did the ideas for these stories come from?

From the lore surrounding the world creation.

Different authors have differing approaches to writing.  Some prepare very detailed plot outlines before they begin on their first draft, while others have a much looser outline and like to see where the story leads them.  What was your approach with Tales of Erana?

 I’m definitely a pantser! I have an overarching plot for the series but the individual books and stories lead me along. For the short stories I usually have a vague idea of what I want but it is vague. Either the story ends up working – or it doesn’t.

Was there any part of the stories that surprised you as it appeared on the screen in front of you? If so, can you tell us about it?

 The ending to Moon on the Water. It’s not an especially happy ending. Essentially it’s a story of war, love and revenge but it started out as a totally different story.

 Some readers of fantasy like end-to-end action, while others prefer a greater emphasis on the personal journey of the main character(s).  Where would the stories in the Tales of Erana sit between these?

 Individual stories range from more action less ‘journey’ to the other way around. Moon on the Water is tale of forbidden magic, love and the war they bring; The Tale of Treyna the Beloved is the story of how the sun and moon became separated in the sky and the arrival of night and day in Erana – basically you could call it a creation myth of sorts. There’s not much action in that one – it’s the ‘journey’ of the elder gods; Storm Born is a lonely mage’s journey to create a companion – and the aftermath; The Legend of Oeliana is a tale of love, vengeance, magic and broken promises – it’s one of the tales which gives hints for later ones; the Blue Phial is a coming of age tale of a young apothecary. Overall I’d say these lean towards more ‘journey’ than action. That said one of the other tales in the series – Tale of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse is pretty much all action.

Are there any underlying messages hidden within the stories (e.g. life lessons, commentary on society, religion, etc) that you’d like to share?

 The world of Erana is a world of myth, magic and monsters. It’s a world where half the population are enslaved, magic is forbidden and the land is run by martial law. There isn’t an intended message, except perhaps hope. There is always someone to fight for those who cannot defend themselves. And the world will be what it will be – despite the people on it.

 Authors can grow quite attached to some of their characters, and sometimes that attachment can be with minor characters who maybe don’t have a big part to play in the novel.  Are there any characters from Tales of Erana who you’d like to explore in more depth?

 In the paperback collection (Tales of Erana: Volume One) we find Coel – an unwilling hero thrust into a situation beyond his control. He is not a bad person, but he does have to do potentially bad and dangerous things – although in the end for a good cause. Coel will appear in a later book/novella. At least I hope so – he’s fun. (He also appears in Nine Heroes.)

And finally, how influential do you think fantasy is in today’s society? 

 I belief it is at the core of our cultures. Western Civilisation has a basis in Ancient Greek and Roman culture, not to mention Nordic, Judeo-Christian and many others. Whether or not one is religious it is easy to see the heroic/mythic/fantasy elements. Example – I’m British, we have St George, several other saints with mythic backgrounds, dragons, fairies and, of course, King Arthur. We have a great tradition of storytelling, and fantasy authors too. From an early I was told fairy tales, fantasy stories about sentient kitchen equipment, and I read CS Lewis, Lewis Carole, and many others.

 Thanks very much for your time A.L. I wish you all the best with your various stories from the world of Erana.

 You can purchase Tales of Erana: Myths and Legends in various formats from the following links:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/

http://www.amazon.com/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/

http://store.kobobooks.com/

And on Audio Book

http://www.audible.com/

http://www.amazon.com/

http://www.audible.co.uk/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse – Free on Kindle

Until 19th July Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse is free on all the Kindle sites.

This short tale within a tale is a mythic story of monsters, revenge and unwise bargains.

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse.

http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY

http://www.amazon.de/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.fr/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.it/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.es/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.nl/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.in/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

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