Remembering Warriors – On Sale – Get it before it’s gone!

Remembering Warriors Bundle is on sale until 31st December – then it’s gone forever.

Now only 3.99!

In commemoration of the World War One Centenary

One hundred years ago, in 1918, the Great War ended after four terrible years. Never had the world seen such a conflict. All touched by its scythe hoped we would never be thusly reaped again. Their hopes were but desperate dreams. Since that first armistice, there have been many more battles, and thousands have given their lives or their health to preserve freedom and escape from tyranny.

A hundred years after the first armistice we still remember and honour those brave souls. But still, the soldiers fall, for the War to End All Wars did not.

Universal Link https://books2read.com/rememberingwarriors

10% of the royalties from the Remembering Warriors bundle will go to the http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/ plus another 10% to https://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/ two charities that support wounded and ex-service personnel and their families, in commemoration of the World War I centenary.

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/b/remembering-warriors

Kobo http://bit.ly/2k26wGv

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2G2IZQ7

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2Dvp7GO

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2zWnKMt

I books http://apple.co/2BFldqf

 

Book #1:

Comrades in Arms by Kevin J Anderson https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/comrades-arms

Book #2:

Outside the Walls by A.L. Butcher and Diana L. Wicker https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/outside-walls

Book #3:

Norman Blood by Barbara G. Tarn https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/norman-blood

Book #4:

The Rise of a Warrior by Harvey Stanbrough https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/rise-warrior

Book #5:

Total War by Russ Crossley https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/total-war

Book #6:

Resonant Bronze by J.M, Ney-Grimm https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/resonant-bronze

Book #7:

Siren by Blaze Ward https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/siren

 Book #8:

The Museum of Modern Warfare by Kristine Kathryn Rusch https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/museum-modern-warfare

Book #9:

Nothing for Nothing by Harvey Stanbrough https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/nothing-for-nothing

Book #10:

The Rescue by Blaze Ward https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/nothing-for-nothing

Book #11:

Soldier, Storyteller by Linda Maye Adams https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/soldier-storyteller

Book #12:

Heroes of Old by Russ Crossley https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/heroes-old

Book #13:

With a Broken Sword by Stefon Mears https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/with-broken-sword

Dirty Dozen – Warrior Bundle – Linda Maye Adams – Military

Author name: Linda Maye Adams

Remembering Warriors is a commemorative Bundle – Why is it important to you to support these causes? The women veterans of wars are often entirely left out of the story.  Worse, they don’t speak up.  I was in a call for veteran’s stories (Red, White & True), and was shocked that I was one of only two women veterans in the entire book.  We need our voices to be heard.

 

Do you have anyone you remember who was wounded or fought in war (either past or present)? I was one of the 40,000 women who served in the first Persian Gulf War, Desert Storm.  But I had one friend who didn’t come home whole from there.  It was hard afterward, watching as she self-destructed bit-by-bit.  The Army taught us how to go to war, but not how to transition back to normal.

*Please tell us about your publications. I’m indie published.  Since the bundle is military-themed, these are some of my publications that focus on the military.

GALCOM Universe series

  • Crying Planet
  • Lonely Planet
  • Watcher Ghost (short story)

Fantasy Novels

  • Rogue God

Speculative Fiction Short Stories

  • Devil Winds
  • Monkey River
  • New Robot Smell
  • Rejected by Aliens
  • Theater Ship

Writing Craft

  • Writer’s Guide to Military Culture

Military

  • Red, White & True
  • Women at War: Stories and Poems – these include poetry written during Desert Storm.

crying planet - cover

What first prompted you to publish your work? I’ve written stories as long as I can remember.  My uncle, Ernie Rydberg, was a writer during the pulp era, and into the 1970s.  I would visit his house in San Diego and see The Writer on his coffee table.  I loved writing stories and having the adventures in the stories, and I always wanted to publish them.  Indie’s a wonderful opportunity to publish stories that the traditional publishers deem as too different.

 What have you found the most challenging part of the process? For Soldier, Storyteller, it was figuring out how to tell this story in a way that was interesting to readers and not doing military babble or “exorcising demons.”  I knew when I came back from Desert Storm that I had a story, but it took 25 years for me to figure out not only how to tell it, but what to tell.  It wasn’t the story I thought 25 years ago, but answering a question that people always asked me: What was it like?

Are you a ‘pantser’ or a ‘plotter’? I’m a pantser.  I’ve had people crossing their eyes when I describe my writing process. I don’t use beats or plan anything at all out.  I don’t even know how the story will end beyond a vague “Good guys win” or “Blow up something.”  I just get an idea and start writing, discovering the story much like a reader discovers the story when they turn the page. It’s a lot of fun following a rabbit hole and finding some really cool that makes the story.

What are your views on authors offering free books? Do you believe, as some do, that it demeans an author and his or her work? Free is too low of a standard, and writers are too eager for validation and accept a low standard.  Years and years ago, I sent stories out to the non-paying markets.  They were easier to get into,  but at a cost.  I did not realize I was subconsciously telling myself I wasn’t good enough to get paid for my writing.  The result was that I never had the incentive to push my craft skills.  Once I started thinking about getting paid professionally, my skills made huge leaps.  I could see what a disservice I did to myself with free when I was invited to write for a non-paying military call from a literary magazine.  They didn’t pay, of course. I had a look a sample story they had posted and immediately passed.  I was already writing above what they were publishing.  My time is important. Free doesn’t respect my time.

Sort these into order of importance:

Good plot

Great characters

Awesome world-building

Technically perfect

This depends on the genre.  If it’s science fiction or fantasy, the awesome world building is at the top of the list because that’s what the readers read for.  If it’s a mystery, great characters come first.  Technically perfect?  Nowhere on my list.  That might please an English teacher, but it doesn’t make for very interesting stories.

How much research do you do for your work? What’s the wildest subject you’ve looked at? For Soldier, Storyteller, I had to research to fill in gaps.  It was hard being a soldier during Desert Storm because we were cut off from the rest of the world!  I did an event timeline of the war and looked up articles in the Tacoma Morning News Tribune about the day my unit left.  I hadn’t remembered it had rained when I left until I saw an article about a storm.  Probably the most shocking thing I found in my research was how close I was to the front line.  We were always told 70 kilometers.  In my head, I translated that was 70 miles.  Nope.  It was 43 miles.  Oh, boy…  I was very glad I didn’t know that at the time.  It made me queasy 25 years later!

 

What’s the worst piece best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing?Outlining.  I was a natural pantser; it was how I started writing.  But I was trying to learn how to be a better writer, and I did not realize that most writing advice assumes outlining.  I picked up so much outlining advice that I broke my writing.

In 2007, I was ready to give up writing novels because they came out so horribly broken that I didn’t even want to show them to other writers for help.  The more broken my writing got, the more advice I read to try to fix what was happening, and the worse the problem got.  I even tried outlining, and the problem got worse.  Other writers were telling me I wasn’t outlining correctly.  I despaired that I would ever be able to write novels.  But I’d been a soldier and it was accomplish the mission.

So I tried writing classes that were popping up everywhere.  I asked, “Are you pantser friendly?” and was told “Yes, we teach both outliners and pantsers.”  Then I’d go to the class and the instructor wouldn’t know what to do with me and often treated me like I was stupid because I wasn’t getting with the program.  Then I ran across Dean Wesley Smith’s site, and his workshops.  I asked him if the workshops were pantser friendly, and he said that was how he wrote.

Whoa!  Someone who wrote like me.

 Tell us about your latest piece? After going to war, I’ve realized I like my adventures safely tucked into a work of fiction, not in real life.  And I write like what I want to read, women having adventures. I currently am writing the third book in a science fiction series that uses my military background but puts a civilian in as the main character.  She travels to different worlds to fix problems with ghosts.  The character is still mystified about how the military works and why no one uses their first names. The book is called Cursed Planet.

 What’s your next writing adventure? You mean I have to pick?  I haven’t decided yet.  I’m from Los Angeles and regularly saw brush fires every year, so I thought that might be a good fit for my ghost science fiction series.  Or I could do an attack on a spaceship and play with how technology both works in unexpected ways and sometimes screws things up.  I’m also thinking about a series set in Hollywood in the 1940s, with Jack Reacher as a woman character.  So many fun ideas, so little time.

Is this the age of the e-book? Are bricks and mortar bookshops in decline? I think that the bookstores are going to have to fundamentally change how they sell books.  Retail has not responded well to all the changes, judging from the number of big companies closing stories, like Macy’s and Sears.  Their default was to expand in either more stores or more diverse products.  Barnes and Noble sells gifts.  Who makes a specific trip to B&N to buy Moleskines or puzzles?  Retail needs to identify what experience they can offer that Amazon can’t, but everyone is still focusing on selling products and not an experience.

Links: http://www.lindamayeadams.com

lonely planet - cover.jpg

Bio:

Linda Maye Adams was probably the least likely person to be in the Army—even the Army thought so!  She was an enlisted soldier and served for twelve years and was one of the women who deployed to Desert Storm.  But she’d much prefer her adventures to be in books.  She is the author of the military-based GALCOM Universe series, including the novels Crying Planet and Lonely Planet.  She’s also received three honorable mentions in the Writers of the Future contest and an honorable mention in Alfred Hitchcock Magazine’s contest.  Linda is a native of Los Angeles, California, and currently lives in Northern Virginia.  Find out more about Linda Maye Adams on her website at http://www.lindamayeadams.com.

https://books2read.com/rememberingwarriors

Learn about Remembering Warriors here

Dirty Dozen Author Interview – Russ Crossley – Warrior Bundle #Sci-fi #Warriorbundle

Author name: Russ Crossley

Remembering Warriors is a commemorative Bundle – Why is it important to you to support these causes? In my family my father and my uncles fought in World War 2. I also have friends who served in Korea in the early fifties. I think we must do whatever we can to support those returning military veterans who were wounded during their time serving their country to honour them and thank them for their service and sacrifice on our behalf.

Do you have anyone you remember who was wounded or fought in war (either past or present)? A German V1 rocket wounded my father when he was stationed in England with the Royal Canadian Army prior to D Day in 1944. He recovered from his wounds in time to participate in the D Day operation. He served in the artillery.

*Please tell us about your publications.

What first prompted you to publish your work? I began writing fiction for sale over twenty years ago but never had any idea how to begin until I attended the Oregon Coast Professional Writers Master Class taught by award-winning professional authors and editors Dean Wesley Smith and Kristine Katherine Rusch. Kris and Dean taught me how to become a better writer and most importantly how the publishing process works and how to break in the business. I then started submitting to The Strange New Worlds writing contest sponsored by Pocket Books and was eventually accepted three times.

What have you found the most challenging part of the process? The overall experience of the traditional publishing process is very challenging to most beginners.

Are you a ‘pantser’ or a ‘plotter’? Very much a  “pantser’. I have tried plotting and found it doesn’t work for me. I enjoy being surprised by the direction the characters take the story. It makes for unexpected twists and turns, which I read for myself.

What piece of advice do you wish you’d had when you started your publishing journey? Trust yourself and don’t be too hard on yourself when you fail.

If you could have dinner with any literary character who would you choose, and what would you eat. Jack Reacher. I would eat a medium rare steak and salad.

What are your views on authors offering free books? Do you believe, as some do, that it demeans an author and his or her work? On a limited basis as a short-term promotion I have no problem with it. On a longer-term or permanent basis, I think this is foolish. I don’t think it demeans them or their work but it fails to recognize that publishing is a business as well as an art and that their work has value. Customers are willing and often want, to pay for this work if they see it has value. Writing is hard work and I feel we should be compensated for this work just like any other job.

What are your views on authors commenting on reviews? Don’t. Ever. Very bad idea.

How do you deal with bad reviews? I place very little weight on any reviews be they good or bad. They are individual opinions based on individual taste and personal biases. You can easily find all sorts of opinions about any art be it film, TV, books, plays, paintings etc. I mostly ignore them except for marketing purposes because I know some folks respond to good reviews.

Sort these into order of importance:

Great characters

Good plot

Awesome world-building

Technically perfect

How much research do you do for your work? What’s the wildest subject you’ve looked at? Currently I’m writing space opera set in the far future so I can pretty much make up whatever I like. But I have done considerable research for some previous projects to get certain details right. The wildest subject I looked at was You Tube videos on how to drive a school bus for a romantic comedy I wrote many years ago called Antique Virgin.

How influential is storytelling to our culture? Extremely important. Storytelling is everywhere on the news in newspapers and magazines. Advertising in every medium uses storytelling either from a static image or in television commercials. The web is a  huge source of storytelling most people don’t even think of as storytelling. Social media is storytelling. Texts, tweets, etc. are storytelling. Even when having a coffee with friends we use storytelling to share news and events. I think it’s what makes us human.

What’s the best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing? Write every day to exercise your mental muscles.

What’s the worst piece best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing? You must hire an agent to be a published author.

If you could be any fantasy/mythical or legendary person/creature what would you be and why? Superman. His role as super hero is far more complicated than it appears on the surface. His powers make him capable of solving most of our earthly problems I find the possibilities very exciting.

Tell us about your latest piece? I am working on Blaster Squad 6 Galaxy of Evil. It is the sixth book in this action/adventure space opera series set in the year 4154. Blaster Squad accepts a mission to stop a powerful enemy force of mercenaries from capturing a strategically important planet. The stakes are extremely high and the action extremely intense.

What’s your next writing adventure? Blaster Squad 7 will conclude the current story line.

What is the last book you’ve read? Dark Matter by Blake Crouch.

Is this the age of the e-book? Are bricks and mortar bookshops in decline? I don’t think so, at least for now. The majority of readers read both eBooks and paper books in the present time. I expect at some point this will shift to more eBooks than paper but we’re not there yet. I do think online stores are becoming a bigger threat to brick and mortar stores than eBooks.

With the influx of indie authors do you think this is the future of storytelling? Even traditional publishers and agents troll the indie authors for new talent so yes I do tend to think indie authors are creative and are bringing originality to the craft of storytelling. And Indies are bringing back some genres the publishing “experts” thought were dead and gone.

Are indie/ self-published authors viewed with scepticism or wariness by readers? Why is this? I think this is lessening over time as more and more readers discover new authors and entertaining original work. I do think indie authors have to up the professionalism of their work with great covers and properly edited and copyedited books. I would, however, stress to readers if you discover mistakes in indie books but love the story cut the author some slack. Any book no matter who publishes it or who edits it tries to present their best work possible. And writing is HARD work.

Is there a message in your books? Love your family and respect those who are different you.

How important is writing to you? I love story and always have. Creating my own worlds has been an exciting and satisfying journey that continues for the foreseeable future.

Links http://www.53rdstreetpublishing.com

Bio: International selling Star Trek author, Russ Crossley writes science fiction and fantasy, and mystery/suspense. Over his more than 20 year career, he has published 18 novels and almost 100 short stories.

His latest science fiction satire set in the far future, Revenge of the Lushites, is a sequel to Attack of the Lushites. Both titles are available in e-book and trade paperback.

He has sold several short stories that have appeared in anthologies from various publishers including; WMG Publishing, Pocket Books, 53rd Street Publishing, Sapphire Blue Publishing, Champagne Books, and St. Martins Press.

He is a member of SF Canada and is past president of the Greater Vancouver Chapter of Romance Writers of America. He is also an alumni of the Oregon Coast Professional Fiction Writers Master Class taught by award winning author/editors, Kristine Katherine Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith.

Feel free to contact him on Facebook, Twitter, or his website http://www.russcrossley.com.  He loves to hear from readers

Warriors boxset

 

Russ’s short story collection features in Remembering Warriors.

https://bundlerabbit.com/products/detail/total-war

Bundle Rabbit https://bundlerabbit.com/b/remembering-warriors

Kobo http://bit.ly/2k26wGv

Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2BGnSQB

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2AdOEmT

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2zWnKMt

I books http://apple.co/2BFldqf

Russ Crossley cover