March Pot O’ Gold Book Giveaway! #Freebooks #Prizes



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March 2018 Literary Giveaway Prizes:

March Giveaway blog (1)

Grab your lucky pair of socks, your rabbit’s foot and/or your go-to lucky charm because N. N. Light’s Book Heaven has an incredible giveaway this month. I don’t know if they kidnapped a leprechaun or what, but they’ve got a potful of goodies to give away. You can win an Amazon gift card, a beautiful St. Patrick’s Day mug, books galore and more. You don’t need to kiss the blarney stone, just have a valid email address. Click on this link to enter today before the leprechaun escapes and claims his treasure:

With so many wonderful authors and books available, it’s imperative to have a reliable and trustworthy place that can help you choose what to read. It’s even better when you get a chance to win free books through a giveaway! Every month, enter to win free books from multiple authors via N. N. Light’s Book Heaven. Several authors are offering their books throughout the upcoming year in this innovative and collaborative approach to building a new and immersive online reading community. Authors, bloggers and book reviewers are partnering to share fantastic reads, quality reviews and powerful connections all in one place.

March Giveaway:

Literary Giveaway Portal:


March Giveaway blog (1)

$10 AmazonUS Gift Card from N. N. Light

An Irish Blessing Coffee Mug from Ruth A. Casie (US and Canada only)

e-copy of Prelude to Sorrow (Book 3 of the IX series) by Andrew Weston

print copy of Once Broken by D. M. Hamblin

e-copy of Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles (18+) Book One by A. L. Butcher (Smashwords voucher)

e-copy of Healing Grace by Lisa Lickel (Smashwords voucher)

2 print copies of Circumstances of Childhood by John Howell

autographed print copy of The Colony by RM Gilmour

autographed print copy of The Last City by RM Gilmour

e-copy of Dan Alexander, Pitcher by Jean Joachim

print copy of Dan Alexander, Pitcher by Jean Joachim (US only)

5 e-copy of Tales of Feyron 3 Book Set by Diana L. Wicker

2 e-copy of The Fairy Wren by Ashley Capes

print copy of The Fairy Wren by Ashley Capes

2 e-copy of Curva Peligrosa by Lily Iona Mackenzie

e-copy of Don’t Let Him Go by Kay Harris

autographed print copy of Quest of a Warrior by Mary Morgan (US and Canada only)

e-copy or print copy of Supernatural Pet Sitter: The Rescue (winner’s choice)

e-copy of The House That Built Me by Melissa Keir

e-copy of Dancing Around the Truth by Alanna Lucas (US only)

March Giveaway


Reviews 2018 – The Hinge Factor – Erik Durschmied – History/Military History


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Amazon UK link The Hinge Factor: How Chance and Stupidity Have Changed History link The Hinge Factor

From the wooden horse at Troy to a harrowing photograph snapped in Vietnam, from Robert E. Lee’s lost battle plans to the evacuation of Dunkirk, world history has been shaped as much by chance and error as by courage and heroism. Time and again, invincible armies fall to weaker opponents in the face of impossible odds, when the outcome had seemed a foregone conclusion. How and why does this happen? What is it that decides the fate of battle?

The Hinge Factor is an instructive, fascinating look at how the unpredictable, the absurd, and the bizarre have shaped the face of history in war.

5 Stars.

What is the ‘hinge factor’? Basically, it is the pivotal event that led to a particular outcome of battle – from generals despising each other and not coming to one another’s aid, to the weather, to misunderstood orders, to a war-journalist capturing an iconic shot – which turned a nation against a war. It’s a ‘what if’.  What if it hadn’t rained at Agincourt? What is it had been cloudy when the Enola Gay dropped the bomb? What if the Trojans hadn’t fallen for the ruse of the Wooden Horse? In many cases, the outcome and possibly history itself would be very different.

The accounts are fairly lengthy but taken from reliable sources (relatively). Yet each and every one reads like a tale of heroes, courage and, often, sheer bloody stupidity. The author is a correspondent – and it shows. He knows his stuff, and he knows what makes a good story and what is important. (check out his Wikipage Erik Durschmied). 

The Vietnam account is actually the author’s own account of what happened in those terrible years, and how news coverage changed the tide of that particular conflict.

The accounts make one wonder how many lives would have not been lost if only the General’s hadn’t behaved like morons, if only it had been cloudy, or hadn’t rained, or the retreating soldiers had spiked their own guns.  I found it quite a moving book – history does indeed repeat itself first as tragedy and then as farce (Karl Marx).

The account I found most interesting was the Berlin Wall. I remember seeing that on TV – something many people would never believe could happen. Within a few hours the tide that had been building suddenly erupted and flowed inexorably towards freedom for East Germany (as it was then). It was the only revolution and ‘battle’ in history where no blood was shed. But what if the border guards had started firing at the crowds? What if the orders had come to stop the tide of humanity? There would have been a bloodbath.

As usual, I am meandering into history, so back to the book.  It’s well written, well researched, thought-provoking and a must for lovers of history, fate and military history.

Swift Six Author – Linda Jordan – Fantasy/Bundle author


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Name: Linda Jordan

Queen of May for promo

Queen of May

What attracts you to the genre in which you write? I write in several different genres—fantasy, science fiction, young adult fantasy and mystery. Basically, I go where my ideas lead me. Sometimes, mystery gets mixed into the other genres. I also write the sort of books I loved to read as a kid. Not so much the mystery—I watched those on tv. But fantasy and science fiction were my core reading material from fifth grade on. As soon as I discovered them, I knew I was home. So when I began writing in my twenties, it was just natural that my characters and worlds would fit there.

What piece of writing advice do you wish you’d known when you started your writing adventures? I wish I’d understood the importance of practice. That I had to let many words stream out my fingertips before I’d get to the good stuff. And how essential it was to sit down on a regular basis, hopefully daily, and just get out of my own way. Tell my critical brain to take a few hours off.

And. Just. Write.

If you could have dinner with any famous person or character who would you choose? The first person who popped into my mind was Tyrion Lannister. I think he’d make a truly entertaining dinner companion. The things he could tell me. Maybe even how the books end!

Who has been the greatest influence on your own work? I can’t pick just one person. I’ve absorbed everything I’ve ever read. Edgar Rice Burroughs, Anne McCaffrey, Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, J.K. Rowling, Connie Willis, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Robin Hobb and Sarah Addison Allen come to mind.

I’ve also had fabulous teachers. Taken workshops from Steve Perry, Terry Carr, Suzy McKee Charnas, Norman Spinrad, Vonda McIntyre, Kris Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith. The last two being the teachers I’ve benefitted from the most.

I’ve belonged to critique groups with wonderful writers. Been supported by other wonderful writers. Probably one of the largest influences on my work is my husband, who goes out five days a week and brings back money and benefits. Which allows me to stay home and write! And our daughter, another inspiration. At 14, she’s tapping away at her own keyboard, creating her own stories. For hour upon end. She’s amazing.

Do you think the e-book revolution will do away with print? No way. I can’t see that. Too many people love the tactile experience of paper books. Even kids who’ve grown up with their brain always attached to a phone or tablet. They read paper books. Ebooks are convenient, I love them. I don’t see paper leaving us anytime soon.

Which 3 books would you take to a desert island and why?

Only 3?

They would have to be large. Something I could take my time and delve into. The compact Oxford English Dictionary? Is that still even around? Maybe I’d just take one volume.

I’d need a non-fiction book. Something entertaining and enlightening. Maybe Barry Lopez or Terry Tempest Williams.

But how could I live without a Fantasy or SF book? Maybe I could cheat and say Blackwatch & All Clear by Connie Willis, since they’re all one book.

Seriously, questions like this make me want to throw up my arms in defeat and run screaming from the room. Being limited to only 3 books for the rest of my life would be a special kind of hell.

So maybe I’ll toss all the above out and just say a trilogy by Robin Hobb. Any trilogy. Just three fat books to chew on until I’m rescued from the island.

 Author bio and book synopsis Linda Jordan writes fascinating characters, funny dialogue, and imaginative fiction. She creates both long and short fiction, serious and silly. She believes in the power of healing and transformation, and many of her stories follow those themes.

In a previous lifetime, Linda coordinated the Clarion West Writers’ Workshop as well as the Reading Series. She spent four years as Chair of the Board of Directors during Clarion West’s formative period. She’s also worked as a travel agent, a baker, and a pond plant/fish salesperson, you know, the sort of things one does as a writer.

Currently, she’s the Programming Director for the Writers Cooperative of the Pacific Northwest.

Linda now lives in the rainy wilds of Washington state with her husband, daughter, four cats, seventeen Koi and an infinite number of slugs and snails.

That’s the official bio.

In reality I divide my days between writing, doing massive amounts of publishing (editing, copy editing, formatting, creating covers, keeping up two websites—one very badly—and pretending to do social media.). That’s my day job. The other jobs include herding the four cats and the teenager, planning everything in our lives (and re-planning them when plans go astray), keeping the budget together, cooking, organizing the to-do list for the half-acre garden, shopping and everything else. Sometimes I clean, but not often. Mostly when I’m procrastinating on writing, because I can’t figure out what comes next. Or I’ve set up an unsolvable problem and my brain is working on it as I clean places that haven’t been touched in a decade, maybe two.

Tell us about your book(s) – title, genre etc (short)

The Queen of May is set in the same world as the entire Bones of the Earth Series. Just a whole lot earlier in time. Faerie Unraveled is the first book in the series. Followed by Faerie Contact, Faerie Descent and Faerie Flight. The final book in the series comes out this April—Faerie Confluence.

Linda has a VERY impressive library to her name – I have posted a selection here, but suggest you check out her bio links for all the others. 

Promoted books Faerie Unravelled 

FaerieUnraveled55X85 (1).jpg



Faerie Summer Bundle

Spring Surprise


Faerie Flight, 2018, print, ebook, Fantasy

Horticultural Homicide, 2017, print, ebook, Cozy Mystery

Faerie Descent, 2017, print, ebook, Fantasy

Faerie Contact, 2016, print, ebook, Fantasy

Faerie Unraveled, 2016, print, ebook, Fantasy



Bibi’s Back, 2017, ebook, Fantasy

To the Stars and Back Again, 2017, ebook, Science Fiction

Stories of the Jeweled Worlds, 2017, ebook, YA Fantasy


Bibi’s Bargain Boutique, 2012, ebook, Fantasy

Elements, 2011, ebook, Fantasy

Elemental: 5 Stories for Teens, 2011, ebook, Fantasy & Science Fiction

Short Fiction:

Coming Into Being, 2018, ebook, Fantasy,

The Magic of Clay, 2017, ebook, Fantasy

To Death and Back Again, 2017, ebook, Fantasy


A Breath from Elsewhere, 2012, ebook, Fantasy




My website:


Metamorphosis Press website:


Twitter (where I rarely go): Linda Jordan@LindaAJordan

Instagram: lindajordanwriter



Reviews 2018 – Eurekaaargh!: A Spectacular Collection of Inventions That Nearly Worked


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Eurekaaargh!: A Spectacular Collection of Inventions That Nearly Worked – Adam Hart-Davis

4 Stars

This work presents 100 stories of weird and wonderful inventions, full-blown and well-developed disasters of what seemed to be brilliant inventions that fell at the first fence, or sometimes the second, like the first steam-powered submarine, still lying on the seabed off North Wales.

I love books like this – the real and rather sad history of things. Most of us remember learning about the Montgolfier balloon; the Wright brothers at Kitty Hawk; George Stevenson and his steam engine; and other notable inventors. But what about those that came before and failed? Or did not have the money to patent their invention? Or those whose inventions were too far ahead of their time to be viable. This is a book about these folks – the men (mostly – sorry ladies) who tried (and sometimes died) to better mankind with gadgets and machines and came to a sorry end.

Mr Hart-Davis has done his homework and tells a good tale. The tone is light-hearted, yet informative. There is enough information to draw in the reader but not so much as to get boring, or confusing.  One could dip in and out of this book, entertain one’s friends with it, or simply wonder at the ingenuity and foolishness of people.

Please note most of these are British inventors.

Recommended for fans of history.




Book Spotlight and Blog Tour – Naval Maneuvers – Military Erotic Romance


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Military Erotic Romance—Naval Maneuvers by Dee S. Knight (@DeeSKnight) #military #romance #eroticromance


Long Blurb:

Men and women of the armed forces experience desire and love pretty much like everyone else. Except, well, there is that uniform. And the hard-to-resist attraction of “duty, honor, service” as a man might apply them to a woman’s pleasure. All things considered, romance among the military is a pretty sexy, compelling force for which you’d better be armed, whether weighing anchor and moving forward into desire, dropping anchor and staying put for passion, or setting a course for renewed love with anchor home.

Individual blurbs: (the book is in three parts)

Weighing Anchor (allowing a ship to move forward by retrieving the anchor): A professional woman sworn to avoiding all things military finds herself in love with a lieutenant commander in the Navy. Love won’t conquer all if she allows her childhood memories to eclipse future happiness.

Dropping Anchor (securing movement by dropping the anchor): Two people find (surprisingly) that they are both in the Navy and love their chosen professions—until one turns out to be an officer but not a gentleman and the other is a gentleman but not an officer.

Anchor Home (safe, smooth sailing): When two former lovers find each other after more than a decade, will a long-hidden secret threaten the course of a rekindled romance or be the cause of it?

Buy Links (Get $2 off until March 9)


Amazon UK

Barnes and Noble


Black Velvet Seductions:




“And what is your name, pretty?” Mel Crandall addressed the dinosaur bones in an undertone, bending nearly to face level. The skeleton displayed an open mouth and rows of fierce, sharp teeth.

“Roger,” a man standing next to her said in a low voice. Startled, she looked up. Up being the operative word. She stood a decent five feet ten inches, and he beat her by a good half foot. She studied him. He ignored her.

The guy had a solid profile, strong chin, chiseled cheekbones, and a straight back with muscular shoulders. Short brown hair. He wore glasses and stared straight ahead, but glasses couldn’t disguise the laugh lines that radiated from the corners of his eyes. His posture was near perfect and he was not overweight, as evidenced by the trim fit of his jeans and red polo shirt that clung enough to give evidence of a low body/mass index number.

As a doctor, she immediately noticed body characteristics before actual looks. But with this guy, examination in lieu of admiration was hard. Men were often put off by the fact that she paid attention to whether they looked sallow or flushed, or if their hands were cold or warm before she “saw” them. She noticed if a man’s eyes were dilated or glittered with fever before she registered eye color. Dates started with mini examinations before she relaxed enough to enjoy personalities, but that’s just the way she was. Men had to take it or leave it. Sadly, most left it. Which was why she talked to dinosaurs at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History all on her own.

Mel moved on to the next exhibit, a shorter built specimen but still tall and with a nasty spiked tail. “I wonder what you looked like,” she murmured. “What color were you, what did you eat, and what’s your name?” She bent to read the exhibit information.

“Gray. Grass.” That same guy had followed her. Rather than having a strong profile, she was beginning to think he was a weirdo. “Annnd, roger.”

Quickly, Mel moved to the next exhibit. “And you are–”


He stood beside her again! Mel started to look for a museum guard but saw none. Great. Planting her hands on her hips, she turned to him. “Stop following me,” she said loudly enough that people in the general area turned to see what was happening.

The guy said, “Hold it.”

Hold it? Hold it, as in “Wait a minute, little lady?” She opened her mouth to lay into him when he turned and removed his glasses, showing her the richest, most chocolatey brown eyes she’d ever seen. The words stuck in her mouth.

“I’m sorry, what?”

In a lower voice she said, “You’re following me from exhibit to exhibit and talking to me. I want you to stop.”

“I didn’t realize…” He wiggled the glasses at her. “I’m working here and I’m afraid I didn’t notice you.”

Well. What was worse, that he was a pervert following her place to place, or that he wasn’t a perv and hadn’t even noticed her?

His brow furrowed while he studied her. “Yes. Yes.” Then he shook his head. “Roger.”

Again with that Roger.

“Gotta go. Later.” Then he smiled at her. “Just a minute, okay?” He folded the glasses and put them first in a protective case. Squatting, he placed a briefcase on the floor and opened it. He stored the glass case inside a pocket. Then he removed something from his right ear—an earbud?—protected it and also put it in the case.

Mel watched all of this with curiosity. He expected her to wait for him? What arrogance. And yet, wait she did. When he stood, holding the case in his left hand and smiled once more, her heart stuttered. The guy was drop dead gorgeous—at least to her understanding of the word. Normally, she appreciated the male form, mostly from a medical viewpoint. This man she enjoyed with pure pleasure.

And Good God. He hadn’t been talking to her, he’d been talking to whoever was on the other end of that earbud. Embarrassment flooded her.

“I’m sorry,” she said. “I thought you were…” She slid her hand between the two of them and then to the exhibits.

“No,” he said. “I apologize. I shouldn’t be testing this stuff around people. The last time I did it a kid thought I was calling him Roger.” His voice had a soft drawl to it. Western Virginia or North Carolina, maybe? Somewhere in the mountains. It felt like a cool stream as it ran over a body hot and tired from hiking: refreshing and invigorating, at the same time soothing and relaxing. She wanted him to talk more.

Stop that! She laughed. “I thought you were naming each dinosaur.” He smiled and dimples indented his cheeks. His eyes crinkled and Mel’s breath caught. This guy should come with a warning label. Approach with caution. Could bring on lustful intentions and ultimately, broken hearts. Take only in small doses and in public places.

He held out his hand. “David Stimson.”

She took it gingerly, half expecting lightning to bolt between them. Nope. Nothing. So much for romance novels. He had a nice hand, large and warm with healthy pink nails, and she grasped it firmly. “Melissa Crandall.”

“Nice to meet you. Do you mind if I wander along with you?” Grasping the briefcase with his left hand, he deftly, he moved to the left of her.

“No, please. It’s a free country.” She walked to the next dinosaur re-creation. “And this one is…” She half waited for his pronouncement.

“Not Roger,” he said, stopping her heart with that killer smile again. He leaned over to read the information. “Torosaurus latus. It says here that these bones were dug up in North Dakota, but that the Torosaurus roamed from Canada to Texas, and that he had the biggest head of any land mammal.”

“Well, I guess that’s something to be proud of,” Mel responded. David laughed and she found herself smiling back. When she moved to the next exhibit, he strolled along with her, hands behind his back.

He pointed to the next specimen. “Poor guy. Starved to death.”

“Oh, yeah? How do you know?”

“Can’t you tell? He’s all bones.”


Author Bio:

A few years ago, Dee S. Knight began writing, making getting up in the morning fun. During the day, her characters killed people, fell in love, became drunk with power, or sober with responsibility. And they had sex, lots of sex. Writing was so much fun Dee decided to keep at it. That’s how she spends her days. Her nights? Well, she’s lucky that her dream man, childhood sweetheart, and long-time hubby are all the same guy, and nights are their secret. Dee loves writing erotic romance and sharing her stories with you. She hopes you enjoy!





Release blitz organized by Writer Marketing Services.

Reviews 2018 – Victorian Murderesses: A True History of Thirteen Respectable French and English Women Accused of Unspeakable Crimes


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Victorian Murderesses: A True History of Thirteen Respectable French and English Women Accused of Unspeakable Crimes

3.5 stars

This is not a bad book, but it’s not particularly good either.

The cases included in this text are:
– Marie Lafarge and Euphemie Lacoste;
– Madeleine Smith and Angelina  Lemoine;
– Celestine Doudet and Constance Kent;
– Florence Bravo and Henriette Francy;
– Gabrielle Fenayrou and Adelaide Bartlett;
– Florence Maybrick and Claire Reymond.

Good points:

  • The French cases were largely unknown to me and that aspect was interesting. The comparisons between French and English middle-class society and the position of women were fairly well discussed.
  • There was a mix of cases, although all were ‘respectable’ women from the time. What was expected of middle-class women, and her own expectations – marriage, children and running the household – were discussed at length.  Many had arranged marriages – often to men much older, or totally unsuitable. Divorce was not a viable option, especially as the father would have maintained control of any children, and the money. Thus most of this women were stuck in relationships, not of their choosing (with the exception of Madeleine Smith – who was in a relationship with a man below her station and disapproved of by her family).
  • Although the cases were discussed fairly sympathetically there was a lot of the authors own views on whether the particular murderess was guilty of the crime she committed. Not all were, and those who were found guilty may not have been. At least one was judged on her moral crimes (adultery) as much as the actual murder.
  • The author had done her research and it showed. The social comparisons were good and I think the most interesting aspect was the emerging position of women in both France and England during the 19th century.  There was good focus on the societal aspects of what may have caused these women to take, or consider taking, the ultimate solution to their woes.

Bad points:

  • The book jumped around a lot. All the time. It became hard to follow and sometimes wasn’t clear which case was being discussed. References to other cases made things more confusing.
  • The accounts were long and meandered. They became stories in their own right. Why is this bad? For a book that is meant to be a non-fic there was too much of the ‘newspaper’ style telling. Give me the facts – if I want a fiction on the subject I’ll read historical fic about the cases.
  • There were quite a few formatting issues.

I just couldn’t really get into the long, often dry accounts of the crimes. It’s a shame because the sociological side of the book was interesting for the most part. If the book had been more structured then the rating would have been higher.


Winter Warmer – Last Few Days!!!!


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Get it before it melts away!!!


Winter Warmer Bundle

Tales of the Seasons – volume 1

Winter Warmer montage

Winter bundle cover (2)

Get it now before it vanishes!

Winter Warmer disappears for good on 1st March 2018

Winter – A time of festivity, of hardship, and cold. Perhaps it remains the most superstitious of seasons and for many the most beloved. Snow, feasting, gifts, religious importance, family and getting together. And of storytelling!

Thirteen tales set in, or about, the harshest season. From witches, winter realms and faery kings, to snowmen who build winter people of meat, to heroes battling to save a friend, and detectives trying to solve wintery crimes and mysteries, to Christmas romance there is something for everyone in this winter warmer.



A. L. Butcher – Interview


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Here’s my latest author interview – yay!

T. R. Robinson Publications

Version 2
Welcome A. L. Butcher

Author of Tales of Erana and many others.

(Links to where books may be found are at the end of this interview.)

Note: Alexandra prefers to utilise a mix of her book cover images etc. in place of an actual profile photograph. (She is not alone.)

Please tell us a little about yourself.

British-born Alexandra Butcher (a/k/a A. L. Butcher) is an avid reader and creator of worlds, a poet, and a dreamer, a lover of science, natural history, history, and monkeys. Her prose has been described as ‘dark and gritty’ and her poetry as evocative. She writes with a sure and sometimes erotic sensibility of things that might have been, never were, but could be.

Alex is the author of the Light Beyond the Storm Chronicles and the Tales of Erana lyrical fantasy series. She also has several short stories in the fantasy, fantasy romance genres with…

View original post 1,749 more words

Narrator Interview – Andrew J Pond


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Name: Andrew J Pond

*Tell us a bit about yourself: I’m a professional actor and drama teacher with over 20 years experience. I also have an eclectic set of skills, such as accents, Muppet voices, magic, juggling, balloon artistry, and Elvis impersonation. I also have a degree in philosophy so I can sound smart at parties.

How did you become involved with audiobook narration and production? I’ve always loved reading, and the sound of my own voice, so…

Is this your day job? It’s one of several. As an actor, you cobble together multiple jobs to avoid the 9-5. I am hoping it becomes lucrative enough to take the sole position.

Do you have a preferred genre?  Do you have a genre you do not produce? Why is this? Authors of Science Fiction/Fantasy seem most responsive to me. This is a genre I personally enjoy reading, so that’s helpful. I think it’s because of the fact I have a facility for character voices and, as an actor, storytelling is something that’s second nature to me.

What are you working on at present/Just finished? I’ve just finished a wonderful book for young people called Jinx and the Faerie Dragons by Victoria Zigler. It’s a great adventure for young readers. Lots of fun characters. I’m presently recording The Waters of Nyra by Kelly Michelle Baker, which is also about dragons. I’m sensing a theme…

*Tell us about your process for narrating?  (Be as elaborate as you like.) I’ve built what is essentially a blanket fort in my office to help with acoustics, because I am a giant child. I like to read through the chapter I’m going to record to make sure I’m aware of any difficult to pronounce words or names, as well as figuring out voices for characters I’ve not recorded yet. So I do spend a good amount of time talking to myself. Then, once I’ve gotten a rough idea, I sit down to record. If I make a mistake, I don’t stop, I snap my fingers and then repeat what I messed up. This makes editing later one much quicker.

What aspects do you find most enjoyable?  The performance, honestly. Especially if I have a bunch of dialogue with multiple characters, which allows me to switch back and forth between voices quickly.

What do you find least enjoyable? Editing. Not because it isn’t interesting (I love learning new skills) but mostly because it’s tedious.

Have you ever found an author you couldn’t continue to work with? How was this resolved? Luckily, no.

Do you consider royalty share when looking for books to narrate? If not why is this? I do consider it. It’s great if you feel confident the book will sell well, and of course, that means passive income. The only times I don’t consider it is if the book is exceedingly long or technical, because it means the amount of work is significantly higher. For that kind of job, I like to get payment at the end of the job.

Do you listen to audiobooks? I used to listen to them all the time, on cassette, which shows just how old I am. I used to have a job that required a lot of driving, and they were awesome for that. I am a bit old-fashioned and like having books in my hands, but I have started listening to audiobooks again, and it really is a lovely way to experience books.

*With many people owning MP3 players do you think this is the future of storytelling? At this point, I wouldn’t bet against anything online or digital. I have an embarrassing history of not understanding technological trends…

Why do you think audiobooks are becoming so popular? I think it’s a combination of ease of use, since everyone’s so on the go, and free time nowadays is limited (not to mention everyone lives on their phones), and the performance aspect. People enjoy hearing a book performed.

Has ACX/Audible fulfilled your expectations? (such as earnings, ease of use, workload etc.?) It’s definitely fulfilled my expectations as far as amount of work. I’m amazed by the selection.

Have you ever had a negative experience producing a book? Thankfully, no.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve had? The technology isn’t that hard. You can do this. Anything that deals with the tech side of it was always intimidating, but the entire recording/editing process turned out to be surprisingly simple.

If you could narrate any book you wanted which would it be and why? Watership Down, by Richard Adams. It was my favorite book as a kid, and I read it multiple times. It’s an incredible adventure story, and has a plethora of opportunities for voices. That or Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Love that title.

Please tell us a silly fact about yourself. I watched Sesame Street daily until I graduated from college.

Where can we learn more about you?

Social Media links:

Instagram: @thadhel1

If you would like to learn more about Jinx and the Faerie Dragons look here:

Barnes & Noble:
Amazon UK: Amazon UK
Amazon US: Amazon US
Amazon Canada:
The Book Depository:

Jinx And The Faerie Dragons Audiobook Cover