Heroika: Dragon Eaters – Audio

Dragon Eaters audioHeroika: Dragon Eaters – Seventeen tales of monsters, myth and mayhem where the outcomes are far from certain and the winners eat the losers. Hear the tales told by Shakespearean actor Rob Goll – very delicious it is too.

This is a wonderful collection of fantasy, heroes and brave deeds from some of the brightest writers of the genre and published by Perseid Press.

 

http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Sci-Fi-Fantasy/Dragon-Eaters-Audiobook/B0193S0YUA/http://www.audible.com/pd/Sci-Fi-Fantasy/Dragon-Eaters-Audiobook/B0193RZ848/http://www.amazon.com/Dragon-Eaters-Heroika-Volume-1/dp/B0193RZ4XI/

Random Friday – Interview with Rufus Redblade – Heroika

Here’s a great interview with Rufus Redblade, hero and dragonslayer.

Barbara G.Tarn - writer

heroika revised 1Hi guys,

I’m Samantha and I come from another world – the original, old Silvery Earth, where people are immortal and never grow up. When I’m not switching bodies at will, I travel to other universes, especially books or movies. That’s how I met Rajveer the vampire, for example!

So, I’m taking over the interviews on this blog! And here I am, meeting people from other books/universes/whatever!

Hello handsome. Tell me a little about yourself.

I am Rufus Redblade. I was once Captain of the Royal Guard, but times have changed. Now I am a blade for hire. I’m a Griffin Rider. We used to be the elite, for it takes a certain sort to tame and ride a Griffin. Many try, few succeed, and fewer still survive it long.

Age? No idea. I don’t keep track of such things.

That’s fine, I don’t do either. Describe your appearance in…

View original post 700 more words

Giveaway! Heroika: Dragon Eaters – win a free copy

We are delighted to announce a chance to win a copy of Perseid Press new release Heroika: Dragon Eaters.  The competition runs until 21st JUly 2015.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Dragon Eaters by Janet E. Morris

Dragon Eaters

by Janet E. Morris

Giveaway ends July 21, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

The art of dragon killing: Dragons have been eating humans for centuries. Now heroes throughout history stalk their legendary foe. Learn how to hunt, kill, and eat the wild dragon. Never before has revenge tasted so good. A literary feast for the bloody-minded. In Janet Morris’ anthology on the art of dragon killing, seventeen writers bring you so close to dragons you can smell their fetid breath. Tales for the bold among you. HEROIKA 1 — DRAGON EATERS, an anthology of heroic fiction edited by Janet Morris, features original stories by Janet Morris and Chris Morris, S.E. Lindberg, Jack William Finley, Travis Ludvigson, Tom Barczak, JP Wilder, Joe Bonadonna, Milton Davis, A.L. Butcher, William Hiles, M Harold Page, Walter Rhein, Cas Peace, Beth W. Patterson, Bruce Durham, Mark Finn.

A Week with the Dragon Eaters – Bruce Durham

Here’s the last interview (for now) with the authors and characters featured in Heroika: Dragon Eaters. Today I welcome Bruce Durham.

Character questions (choose from):

*Who are you? I’m Mackenzie Secord, though my friends call me Mac. I captain an ice-clipper and hunt food.

Why are you embarking on this quest? Quest? I wouldn’t call what I do a quest. We hunt to survive.

Where are you from? (Tell us about it) I’m originally from Newmarket, near Toronto, but that’s a lifetime ago. Now what few of us remain live in an abandoned military base in the Arctic. It’s a good location, some natural defences, and the wyrms aren’t near as abundant as they are in the warmer climes. At least, for now.

*Tell us about dragons in your world. We call them wyrms. They don’t fly, just crawl and burrow. Tough as all hell, too. They only have one real weak spot.

What is the political system of your world? These days? Chaos. I have no idea how many of us are left on this world. Sometimes we make contact with other settlements via shortwave. But that’s just sometimes. Doesn’t usually last long.

Do you have a family? Not any more. Next question.

Do you see yourself as a hero? What is a hero? Haven’t got a clue. I’m a survivor. I look after my crew and pray I can get them home safely. If that makes me a hero, then so be it.

What is the technology level of your world? I don’t right know anymore, though we’re probably a generation away from barbarism, if we live that long.

Where do dragons come from? Apparently through a series of portals. Scientists theorized it was some kind of alternate dimensional thing. Frankly, it’s above my pay grade.

Are there other such monsters in your world? God, I hope not!

Author questions (choose from):

*Who are you? Bruce Durham. Author of some thirty plus short stories. Sometime artist. Now currently semi-retired from the working world.

Why did you choose this world/era to write in? I’ve always had a fascination with the Arctic. This theme allowed me to explore an idea of mine, how remnants of mankind would chance settling in some remote, seemingly inhospitable part of the planet just to prevent their extinction.

Give us a couple of lines about your characters. All of my characters are survivors. Mackenzie captains the crew of an ice-clipper in search of food for her settlement. Before that she was in the army, and when the wyrms arrived, become one of the first females to pilot a Mühle, a construct designed to fight the invaders.

How much research did you need for your story? I did a fair amount on the Arctic, primarily the abandoned DEW line bases and some of the geography in northern Canada.

Have you written for anthologies before? How does it differ from writing a novel? I’ve been involved with several anthologies over the years. I enjoy writing short stories. Themed anthologies can be especially fun, though challenging, but worth it when a story is accepted.  Unlike novels, short stories force you to get right down to business and (hopefully) hook the reader from the get-go.

Are you a plotter or a pantser? I’m definitely a plotter, though the pantser takes over while doing the actual writing. It’s a trade-off, so long as I stick to the story I’ve outlined.

What other novels/short stories have you written? No novels yet, but I’ve appeared in several publications and anthologies over the years. My very first sale, The Marsh God, was published in ‘Flashing Swords’. It placed first in the annual Preditors & Editors poll that year for best SF&F in the short story category. It was subsequently adapted into a graphic novel. Some anthologies I’ve appeared in are:  Valley of Bones in ‘Return of the Sword’, Yaggoth-Voor in ‘Rage of the Behemoth’, Deathstalk in ‘Sha’Daa: Last Call’, Plains of Hell in ‘Lawyers in Hell’, Colony in ‘Rogues in Hell’ and Hell-hounds in ‘Poets in Hell’. Anezka appeared in ‘Paradox: The Magazine of Historical & Speculative Fiction’ and I have a couple of stories in the ‘Lovecraft eZine’: The Crane Horror and The Case of the Galloway Eidolon. The latter was a Sherlock Holmes/Lovecraft crossover with a serious shout-out to The Dark Man by Robert E. Howard.

What book(s) are you currently reading? The Invasion Year by Dewey Lambdin and Monster Hunter International by Larry Correia.

Tell us one unusual fact about yourself. I walked away from a plane crash back in the early 70s.

Author website/blog: www.brucedurham.ca

Twitter: @BJDurham

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bruce.durham

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4505352.Bruce_Durham

Amazon page: http://www.amazon.com/Bruce-Durham/e/B004NMV5HS

A Week with the Dragon Eaters – Tom Barczak

Yes, yes I know it’s been more than a week. There ARE seventeen authors so what did you expect?

Here’s today’s interview with Ton Barczak and his character Lucretia

Character questions:

Who are you? “My name is Lucretia. I’m the daughter of Erdot, the blacksmith.”

Why are you embarking on this quest? “I didn’t know I was, really. I was seduced by the spell of the village priest, or at least that’s what I thought he was.”

Where are you from? (Tell us about it) “We live, or at least we used to live, just outside the village of Cornwallace, all of my life. But I don’t think I can go back there now now.”

Tell us about dragons in your world. “Secretive. And very, very, dangerous. They  are to be left alone, unless they try to hurt someone you love. Then you kill them without mercy.”

Do you have a family? “Not anymore. My father raised me until the black dragon killed him. My mother, she died when I was very young.”

What is the best way to kill a dragon? “A hammer down it’s gullet.”

Do you see yourself as a hero? What is a hero? “No. But my mother and my father were. They were very brave, if that makes you a hero. They weren’t afraid to love. They weren’t afraid of anything.”

Are there other such monsters in your world? “Can I go?”

 

Author questions:

Who are you? Tom Barczak. I am an author, architect, and artist.

How do you define a hero? Someone who serves others without any thought of themselves.

How much research did you need for your story? Don’t know if this is research but I did have 2 odd personal goals for this story.

First was to describe a character with poor eyesight and no vision correction. You never see that in medieval fantasy. Everyone must have had 20/20 vision back then. I think I got to do that with this, describe an impairment without doing so from a modern point of view. My next story I’ll take on hearing. What?

The second was just my homage to my Dungeons and Dragons roots while still avoiding copyright infringement. That’s where the black and gold dragons come in.

Have you written for anthologies before? How does it differ from writing a novel? I love writing short stories. I tend to write in small pieces. Short stories are a bit more manageable, that way. They allow me to cover more ground.

Are you a plotter or a pantser? I’m a little bit of both. A structure must be had first to build off of. But beyond that, the story will write itself if you listen. Sometimes the hardest part is just listening.

What other novels/short stories have you written? Veil of the Dragon

http://www.amazon.com/Veil-Dragon-Tom-Barczak/dp/0985402202/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1432665995&sr=1-1&keywords=veil+of+the+dragon

Some of my shorter works are in the following:

Dreamers in Hell

http://www.amazon.com/Dreamers-Hell-Heroes-Book-16-ebook/dp/B00DEB1IJE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1432666141&sr=1-1&keywords=Dreamers+in+Hell

Poets in Hell

http://www.amazon.com/Poets-Hell-Heroes-Book-17-ebook/dp/B00KWKNTTW/ref=pd_sim_351_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=12T37VYZGH6VYVKG1ZBX

Nine Heroes

http://www.amazon.com/Nine-Heroes-Tales-Heroic-Fantasy-ebook/dp/B00IMPCYQ8/ref=pd_sim_351_21?ie=UTF8&refRID=1KPN4A147VC3V10B7PMQ

Terror by Gaslight

http://www.amazon.com/Terror-Gaslight-Fantom-Enterprises-Production-ebook/dp/B00NHWBRZA/ref=pd_sim_351_20?ie=UTF8&refRID=1KPN4A147VC3V10B7PMQ

Tell us one unusual fact about yourself. I can sometimes see sounds and hear colors. I can even taste even smells. I think I have a mild case of synesthesia.

 

Author website/blog

Twitter: https://twitter.com/barczaktom

Facebook: www.facebook.com/thomas.barczak

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&query=Tom+Barczak

Amazon page: http://www.amazon.com/Tom-Barczak/e/B006SOKHMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1432735471&sr=8-1-fkmr1

 

Provide a tidbit:

Dragons taste like chicken.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Week with the Dragon Eaters – Alexandra Butcher/Ilsa

At the risk of being self serving I thought I’d join in the fun of Heroika week.

Heroika: The Dragon Eaters

Character questions (choose from):

*Who are you?

I am Ilsa, of the Order of Blood Sisters. My past is my own concern, the Order do not ask such questions and most of us tell no such answers. My kind know the wisdom of the old ways, we know the power of blood, and the old gods.

Why are you embarking on this quest?

Why? Because the Followers of Arun have brought us to this. The Archduke Darrin is dead, murdered, his sons are dead. The only hope we have is a dying girl-child of his line and her noble mother. If the Ivory Throne does not hold the pure blood there will be civil war as the nobles squabble over it. Not a worthy man among them to rule this land, puppets and sycophants all.  War striped this land of its dignity and the return of war will ruin it.  I embark on this quest for love, for love of this land, of what it once was and could be again and for the love of the peace which is so fragile.

*Tell us about dragons in your world.

The dragons are ancient creatures, from a time when the world was free. Thus they are of the world, far more so than humans, who merely live on it until such time as it is cleansed. In the old times they were revered as the primal beasts they are. Now the people forget, but the land does not. The dragons do not. Their blood hold much magic, the ancient magics from before the coming of Arun, that fool. Do not think them kind, or noble, or even possessing the morals most people claim they have. Dragons are killers, the ultimate killers. They once ruled and may do so again when the time of Mankind is done. Dragons have the hunger which drives all creatures and none of the illusions with which we fool ourselves.

They fly, they fight, they hunger. They kill with caustic breath, claws and fangs like blades and sheer power. Not many dare fight them, and of those who do most die.

What is the best way to kill a dragon?

With courage, luck and a very good plan. If any of those fail….

Do you see yourself as a hero? What is a hero?

I am merely a Bloodsister, no greater or lesser than my sisters who share my skills.  I would not say I was a hero, for those are far too few these days.

What is a hero? One who will risk all for what is right. One who will stand and do what must be done. One who does not turn from the job in hand and one who will speak for the voiceless.

Author questions (choose from):

*Who are you?

  1. L (Alexandra) Butcher, fantasy author, poet, lover of history and nature. I’m a scholar, a dreamer, a lover and a writer.

How do you define a hero?

Someone who does not think about their own wellbeing when faced with a dangerous challenge. A person who will defend what they see is right, and those who often cannot defend themselves. A person who is selfless, brave and modest about it, they simply do what is needed without expecting any thanks, indeed sometimes despite criticism.  There are many heroes in our world.

How much research did you need for your story?

Spear usage, flying creatures, and mountain terrain. I tend to do quite a bit of research for novels.

Have you written for anthologies before?

I have an anthology of mythic-style tales, plus another short story set in the world of my novels. I also have several poems and short fantasy and/or horror tales in anthologies with the Indie Collaboration and a group of Smashwords authors.

How does it differ from writing a novel?

Telling a tale in, say, 5000 words instead of 50000 has a number of challenges. One needs to be a lot more succinct and there is a lot less room for character or complex world building. In many instances it depends on the length and style of the story. For example I have some short tales about the Kitchen Imps – pesky little creatures that steal socks, knock food from shelves and generally get up to no good unseen by people. There is not enough material for a novel but they work well for short tales.  Another example – the tales of lore for my Tales of Erana are good ‘fireside tales’ of monsters, myth and legends of the world of Erana, but again only as part of a novel or short story.

A novel, at least for me, needs a lot more background, more character building and a continuous level of action and excitement.  I hate books with little or poor world/character building. Make me care what happens.

What book(s) are you currently reading?

I’ve just finished re-reading the Odyssey, I read it some years ago when I was studying Classics, and I’d forgotten what a gem it is. This time the read through was for a course on Greek and Roman mythology. I’m about to start the Aeneid, which I’ve not read before.

I’m also reading the other Dragon Eaters stories, plus a fascinating book about pirates. Oh and an account of true crime in the 17th Century (which is hard going).

How important is the fantasy genre to our society?

I believe fantasy, myth and folklore are core to our cultures. Why? Look around you – it’s everywhere. In Britain we have a rich mythic heritage – George and the Dragon, fairies, elves, Welsh dragons, Scottish monsters, imps, sunken towns, ghosts, goblins, witches, King Arthur. Even Robin Hood – the outlaw who robbed the rich to give the money to the poor. The Heroic mythic is all over the place.  There are influences from Scandanavia, Rome, Celts, Christian, Pagan, Indian, Chinese and many more. In such a diverse country the folklore is rich indeed. Storytelling is vitally important – be it via books, movies, even games. This is how we learn about ourselves, dream, adventure, and seek the past – albeit a fantastical one. How many kids dress up as St George? Fantasy Princesses? Fairies? Monsters? As adults perhaps we lose a lot of the wonder of fantasy – but it’s there in the background. Novel reading is an escape from real life, it’s a way to find a new world and meet new people.

Tell us one unusual fact about yourself.

I am claustrophobic and caulrophobic.

Tidbit:

Hot and Sour Dragon Soup

Prep time 10 mins (plus however long it takes to kill the dragon) Cooking time 30 mins- 1 hour depending on size of cauldron.

1 large cauldron spring water or watered wine or ale as preferred.

1 small goblet fresh dragon’s blood (for stock)

2 large handfuls St George’s mushrooms (if in season)

1 small handful Penny Bun Bolete

Selection of bamboo shoots

2 cloves chopped garlic

3 slices fresh ginger

1 spoon chopped dragon’s breathe chilli (size of spoon according to taste –mild to certain death as required)

1 dragon cullion per person

1 dragon’s egg – lightly beaten

2 table spoons of cornflour

3 tablespoons white wine vinegar

Sesame oil and herbs to flavour

Cooking instructions

  • In large cauldron combine the dragon’s blood, water (ale) mushrooms, ginger, garlic, and crushed chilies. Bring to boil then cover the pot, settle on the heated stones or reduce the heat to simmer.
  • Place the cullions in a bowl, toss in sesame oil to coat and roll in the herbs. In a separate bowl stir together cornflour, wine vinegar (or wine) and set aside.
  • Bring stock back to boil as add the coated cullions, drizzle in the beaten egg until long strands are created. Add in the beaten cornflour and vinegar. Simmer until the stock is thick and the cullions cooked through.
  • Serve with ricebread, hardtack, bread or noodles.

 

 Paperback UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/HEROIKA-1-Dragon-Eaters/dp/0986414034/ 

Paperback US http://www.amazon.com/HEROIKA-1-Dragon-Eaters/dp/0986414034/

Heroika 1 Perfect promo 6&9

Blog: https://libraryoferana.wordpress.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6430414.A_L_Butcher

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Alexandra-Butcher/e/B008BQFCC6/

Twitter:@libraryoferana

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarkFantasyBeyondTheStorm

Heroika Dragon Eaters Anthology Interview with Beth W. Patterson

A great interview with Beth W Patterson – one of the Heroika authors.

Legends of Windemere

HEROIKA1 New banner heroika_TChirezpromo

Welcome to Beth W. Patterson and Thérèse Naquin. Hope everyone enjoys the questions and check out this new release.

Character Questions

Who are you?

My name is Thérèse Naquin, but they call me Pichou. (That means “wildcat” in Creole.)

Where are you from? (Tell us about it).

I am from St. Landry Parish in Louisiana, not too far from a little town called Grand Prairie. It’s not a big city, but there’s lots of stuff to do. Hunting, fishing, playing Cajun music, going to dances and to the bingo games are what the grownups like to do. Some of the old people still speak French. I like it because ther are other children to play with, but if you want to be by yourself, it’s safe. And there are plenty of snakes, turtles, frogs, and lizards.

Tell us about dragons in your world.

There was only one that I ever…

View original post 1,467 more words

Heroika Dragon Eaters Anthology Interview with Joe Bonadonna

Joe’s interview for Heroika

Legends of Windemere

HEROIKA1 New banner heroika_TChirezpromo

Welcome to Joe Bonadonna and Vadreo. Hope everyone enjoys the questions and check out this new release.

Character Questions

Who are you?

My name is Vadreo. I am a Gluriahan warrior, a Warhand of Thoon Wolf. My blood is the blood of the Dragon Eaters of old.

Where are you from? (Tell us about it)

I was born in the Bloodland of K’Thoon Morai. This is the land to which my people, the Gluriah, fled hundreds of years ago when the Vuladraakoi, the Mountain Dragons, destroyed our ancestral homeland of K’Shar Wovay. The realm of my people is rich in forests and farmland, fresh water, hills, mountains, and to the south-east, a vast and barren desert. We are farmers and fishermen, craftsmen, artisans, and hunters. But first and above all, we are warriors.

Tell us about dragons in your world.

The last dragon was slain nearly five centuries ago. According…

View original post 953 more words

A Week with the Dragon Eaters – Janet Morris

As today is a special day – the release of the anthology itself I’d like to welcome back Janet Morris.

Over to you, Janet…

Character questions :

*Who are you? I am Penthesilea, queen of the Azzi lands, what you would call an Amazon.  I have two breasts, by the way, as do my sisters.

Why are you embarking on this quest? This dragon hunt is meant to rid Paeonia of this plague of dragons, and that feat, if successful, will keep them from overrunning Azzi-Hayasa, where I rule. But I am here not for dragon claws to wear around my neck, or for the glory of beating these self-proclaimed dragon eaters at their own game,  but because when hunting I killed my beloved sister, Hippolyta. Therefore,  my quest is for honorable death in battle, not scaly trophies.  I can find what I seek here, if the gods allow. If not, I’ll find it on the beach at Ilion, where I’ve been invited to join in the defense of Troy against the Danaans.

*Tell us about dragons in your lands. Dragons are fearsome legged serpents, pestilential, destroyers of flocks and crops.

What is the political system of your land?  I am now queen of the Azzi lands, ruled by women since Aegaea’s time.  I am daughter of Ares and Otrera, and with my sisters we rule and defend our people – mostly women; we keep only the best of men as breeding slaves; when we bear male children, we send them to their fathers or expose them on hilltops. Homer and his ilk call us Antianeirai (‘those who fight like men’). We tamed the first horses and invented the use of cavalry forces.

Do you have a family? My sisters born were Hippolyta, Antiope and Melanippe, all of us daughters of the god of war and Otrera.  We Azzi warrior women are dwindling in numbers. Soon we will be gone. Some say I am the bravest queen and warrior ever among us, even , but now I am the most bereft.

What is the best way to kill a dragon? The best way to kill a dragon is band together to stab him in the eyes or through the throat. Since I’ve come here I’ve slain a dozen, along with the other dragon eaters gathered for this competition.

Do you see yourself as a hero? What is a hero? A hero is one who so distinguishes herself in battle that she dies honorably, or lives while she destroys a mighty enemy for the pleasure of the gods and the safety of weaker mortals.

Author questions: Heroika: The Dragon Eaters is a dark heroic fantasy – as all heroic fantasy was by definition dark until recent times.  The heroic model fascinates me:  moderns call it species altruism, but heroic models and heroic ethos have been with us since the earliest days of humanity. In writing heroic fiction and heroic fantasy, I am delving into the commonality of humans at their best – and sometimes at their worst. Many great heroes of literature and history have been deeply flawed, yet their heroism made them role-models to generations.

How much research did you need for your story? I always research everything I write; even if I am writing alternate history or science fiction, or a book that is primarily allegorical, I am human.  I can only write about what humans know about. And what humans know best is the testing that defines them and makes them unique.  Our human condition, which always ends in death, is the song we all must sing. Learning about how others perceive life and death, eschatology, if you like, is a study I find endlessly fascinating. And, as a writer, I take the paths that other writers have taken – research historical models on which to build fantastical characters, or recount the stories of human history in my own way. The more I learn, the more I realize that history and fantasy are two sides of the same coin; for me, heroic fiction is the edge of that same coin.

Have you written for anthologies before? How does it differ from writing a novel? I enjoy conceiving and writing for anthologies that have a defined nature and/or objective.  The limitations of short fiction then become its greatest strengths – the writer as hero answers the call to duty:  to tell a story that might well be true, or might once have been true, or might someday be true.

What other novels/short stories have you written?  I have written books and stories about heroes who are historical, mythological, legendary, and fantasies of my own creation. These include the Sacred Band of Stepsons series, the heroes in Hell series, the biographical novel of Suppiluliumas 1 of Hatti, I, the Sun, the Silistra Quartet, Outpassage, as well as stories for Thieves’ world, the iconic fantasy shared-universe into which I brought legendary and historical characters.

What are you reading? King Lear, by William Shakespeare; The Western Canon by Harold Bloom.

How important is the fantasy genre to our society? The fantasy genre goes back as far as the legend of Gilgamesh and comes with us on our journey of mental and spiritual evolution. Every great writer has written fantasy or prose with fantasy elements, which help us explore our humanity.

Tell us one unusual fact about yourself: I like music, literature and horses better than people.

Tidbit: Both the stories written by Janet Morris and Chris Morris for Heroika 1: Dragon Eaters are historically/mythically based.  The First Dragon Eater is a synthesis of the various versions of the Hittite and Hurrian Illuyankas myth rendered in story form – and arguably the earliest myth about dragons (with the possible exception of references in Gilgamesh, which were not actual separate myths). The second story, “Bring Your Rage” is based on Rhesos of Thrace and Penthesilea as they appear in Homer’s Iliad, and closely related to the authors’ novel in progress, Rhesos of Thrace.  Rhesos himself is closest related to the ancient hero cult, Heros equitans, and the various early carvings in what was once Thrace.

Author website/blog:

Twitter: @uvmchristine

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/JanetMorrisandChrisMorris?fref=ts

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author_blog_posts/8161482-heroika-dragon-eaters-heroic-fiction-fantasy-myth-new-release

Amazon page:  http://www.amazon.com/HEROIKA-DRAGON-EATERS-Janet-Morris-ebook/dp/B00VFVCQRS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1432068794&sr=1-1&keywords=heroika+1+dragon+eaters

 

heroika revised 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Week with the Dragon Eaters – Chris Morris

Today I welcome author, singer and songwriter Chris Morris and his character.

Character questions:

*I am Tarhunt the Storm God of the Hittites and the Hurri lands.

Why are you embarking on this quest? The dragon Illuyankas brought me battle and vanquished me, eating my heart and my eyes.  From that day on, I planned revenge, and now I will take it, using my own children, now grown,  to triumph over this dragon who eats the children of our country.

Where are you from? I live in the heavens, but my main temples are in Nerik and Hattusas

*Tell us about dragons in your world. This dragon Illuyankas demands human children for sacrifice.  He is a dragon of the sea, and sometimes he mates with human women.

Do you have a family? I begot upon the daughter of a poor man and a goddess  a  son named Sarruma, through whom I will avenge myself upon the dragon Illuyankas. And also I begat a daughter, to help me lay low this dragon and stop him and his family from eating Hattian children.

What is the best way to kill a dragon? To kill such a dragon, even a god must go carefully.  I will smite him with my lightnings, and overcome him with my lightnings. I will strike the sea, and it will arise to my purpose.  I will summon the storms, and they will come to aid me. When he is weak I will pierce his eyes with my trident. I will make the sea boil with my wrath, and the dragon will die of my rage.

Do you see yourself as a hero? What is a hero?

To be a god, one must be a hero.  One must heed the peoples of the lands, and bring good things upon them.  I bring the thunder, the lightnings, the rain to nourish beasts and crops. I fight beside my people when they war, striking down their enemies and even their gods.  I summon the rain and the wind and all weather.  In the Hatti lands, where we have 1,000 gods, I rule them all. For the sake of my peoples, I call the other gods to aid me and together we fight great battles.

Author questions: I am Christopher Crosby Morris, writer, narrator, and musician. I have been a defense policy analyst and futurist.

How do you define a hero? A hero is one who serves a cause greater than the self.

Why did you choose this era to write in? This anthology needed to start with a dragon from earliest days of myth. I chose the Hittite and Hurrian Illuyankas myth because it may well be the earliest battle of god and dragon ever told.

Give us a couple of lines about your characters.The narrator of my story is Kella, the actual narrator of one of tablets that record a variant of the Illuyankas myth. In my story Kella, high priest of Nerik, in the north of Hatti, tells a first-hand account of the second battle between the dragon and the storm god.  The hero of this tale is the storm god himself, Tarhunt, who begets two children specifically to help him defeat the dragon who previously had eaten his heart and his eyes. There is another variant of this story, in which Tarhunt’s daughter and her human lover get the dragon drunk and tie him up so that the gods can come down and slay him, but that is not the variant we tell. In our story, although the storm god’s daughter has a role, he himself fights this rich and predatory dragon…  and if I tell you more, I’ll give away the story’s ending.

Heroika: The Dragon Eaters is a dark heroic fantasy – how do you define that genre? Dark heroic fantasy was once called simply heroic fiction or mythology – which is always dark, always allegorical, and usually carries a moral whose value is shown in the story. For me, heroic fiction is any tale in which a character strives to put aside his personal well-being in search of a solution to problems greater than his own.

How much research did you need for your story? My wife, Janet Morris, and I have spent many years reading and researching Ancient Near Eastern myth and legend, some of mankind’s earliest stories. But researching in detail the myth of Illuyankas required not only a deep familiarity with the various versions of the story, but enough command of the early texts to be able to create a single version out of several.

Have you written for anthologies before? How does it differ from writing a novel? I have written for a number of shared universes, including Janet Morris’ Heroes in Hell universe, Bob Asprin and Lynn Abbey’s Thieves’ world universe, C.J. Cherryh’s Merovingen Universe, and more.  I actually enjoy the challenges of working in a shared cosmos. I’ve also written stand-alone short stories, another different form. A novel allows you time to work with more layers of story than does a short story, in which space is very limited.  In a short story, you must know everything about the “past” of the characters, but not tell all, only the climax. So compression of the most radical sort is needed for a short piece of fiction which must have a beginning, middle, and end in a confined space.

What other novels/short stories have you written? With Janet Morris, I have written a number of novels:  The Sacred Band is my favorite, with its grand canvas and heroic ethos. I have also co-written The Fish, the Fighters and the Song-girl, Outpassage, The 40-Minute War, Threshold, Trust Territory, The Stalk, The Little Helliad, M.E.D.U.S.A, and other novels, including several by pseudonyms.

Tell us one unusual fact about yourself. Recently, I came to the craft of narration, and found that it allows me to mix my musical, technical, and prose skills in a new and most satisfying way.  I have just finished narrating The Sacred Band for Perseid Press, available on Audible.com, and am just in the final stages of producing I, the Sun for Perseid Press, which will be released on Audible.com for Perseid Press.

Tidbit: My favorite recipe for dragon meat is simply to brush it with olive oil and vinegar and cook it over an open fire for about two hours, or until the skin is black and the scales fall off.

Author website/blog:  sacredbander.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christopher.c.morris.7?fref=ts

Amazon page:  http://www.amazon.com/Chris-Morris/e/B008L41JNO/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_2

11143231_897184103657050_5318210832294606375_o