Book Spotlight – Addict (The Cassie Tam Files) #Sci-fi #Crime #Lesfic

Title: Addict (The Cassie Tam Files #1)

Author: Matt Doyle

Genre: Lesfic, Sci-fi, Crime Noir

Main character description (short):

Born in Vancouver, Cassie Tam is the daughter of a cop and an out lesbian. Now situated in the technological haven of New Hopeland City, she plies her trade as a Private Investigator, taking on odd job cases that the police either don’t care about or won’t touch. She’s built up a good reputation over the years and tends to solve cases with a healthy mix of the three S’s: smarts, snark, and sheer stubbornness. Oh, and the odd assist from her robo-gargoyle pet, Bert. Despite her tough exterior though, Cassie is prone to keeping stuff in, and is more than capable of finding social awkwardness when faced with the unfamiliar. That combined with her compulsion to keep digging, even when she knows she shouldn’t, can often leave her biting off more than she can chew.

Synopsis:

New Hopeland was built to be the centre of the technological age, but like everywhere else, it has its dark side. Assassins, drug dealers and crooked businessmen form a vital part of the city’s make-up, and sometimes, the police are in too deep themselves to be effective. But hey, there are always other options …

For P.I. Cassie Tam, business has been slow. So, when she’s hired to investigate the death of a local VR addict named Eddie Redwood, she thinks it’ll be easy money. All she has to do is prove that the local P.D. were right to call it an accidental overdose. The more she digs though, the more things don’t seem to sit right, and soon, Cassie finds herself knee deep in a murder investigation. To make matters worse, Cassie’s client, the deceased’s sister Lori, is a Tech Shifter – someone who uses a metal exoskeleton to roleplay as an animal. Cassie isn’t one to judge, but the Tech Shifting community has always left her a bit nervous. That wouldn’t be a problem if Lori wasn’t fast becoming the first person that she’s been genuinely attracted to since splitting with her ex.

Easy money, huh? Yeah, right.

Brief Excerpt 250 words:

I ALWAYS DID like Venetian blinds. There’s something quaint about them in a retro-tacky kinda way. Plus, they’re pretty useful for sneaking a peek out the front of the building if I feel the need. That’s something that you just can’t do with the solid, immovable metal slats that come as a standard in buildings these days. That said, a thick sheet of steel is gonna offer you a damn sight more security than thin, bendable vinyl, so I keep mine installed. Just in case.

Another round of knocking rattles the front door, louder this time than the one that woke me.

The clock says 23:47, and the unfamiliar low-end car out front screams “Don’t notice me, I’m not worth your time,” which makes for the perfect combo to stir up the paranoia that the evening’s beer and horror-film session left behind. This is my own fault. My adverts are pretty descriptive in terms of telling what I do: lost pets, cheating partners, theft, protection, retrieval of people and items, other odds and sods that the city’s finest won’t touch…I’ve got ways to deal with it all. That’s right, I’m a real odd-job gal. The one thing that I don’t put in there are business hours. The way I see it, even the missing pet cases usually leave me wandering the streets at half-past reasonable, so what’s the point in asking people to call between certain hours?

More knocking, followed this time by the squeak of my letterbox.

 

Why should readers buy this book (50 words max)? Described as Sam Spade meets Blade Runner, Addict throws an old-style PI into a near future world and blends sci-fi world building with noir corruption. If you want a speculative fiction title with an LGBT lead that isn’t a coming out tale or erotica, this is the book for you!

 

Addict-f (1).jpg

 

Links etc.

Purchase Links

Amazon.co.uk 

Amazon.com 

Ninestar Press

Smashwords

Barnes and Noble

Kobo

Apple

Author Links

Website: www.mattdoylemedia.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/mattdoylemedia

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MattDoyleMedia/

Google+: https://plus.google.com/105461183776248861486

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14173377.Matt_Doyle

Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/mattdoylemedia/

DeviantArt: http://mattdoylemedia.deviantart.com/

RedBubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/mattdoylemedia

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mattdoylemediaprojects/

Tumblr: https://mattdoylemedia.tumblr.com/

Wattpad: https://www.wattpad.com/user/mattdoylemedia

 

 

Author Interview Number Eighty-Seven – Chambers Mars (Carter Seagrove) – LGBT and Thriller/Crime Fiction

Welcome AUTHOR – CHAMBERS MARS (who, together with Alp Mortal, is also Carter Seagrove)

BIO

I am French, living in Saint Tropez. I travel widely, collecting and dealing in art. My childhood home is in a village not too far from the place where Alp Mortal lives in France.

I am vegan, a Buddhist and a dog owner – I have a Jack Russell/Italian Greyhound mix by the name of Pinocchio (Jack Russell with long legs and a superiority complex to match).

Together with Alp Mortal, I am half of Carter Seagrove, author of Dust Jacket and The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries.

Alp Mortal, Chambers Mars and Shannon M. Kirkland are The Carter Seagrove Project LLC – an independent book publisher. Find us at http://www.carterseagrove.weebly.com, on Twitter @carterseagrove and on Facebook www.facebook.com/thecarterseagroveproject.

Q&A

Where do you live and write from?

I generally spend my time in Saint Tropez – I prefer the climate! I do spend time at the house in Saint Hilaire in Haute Saone, near to the spiritual retreat where Alp lives for part of the year. I generally only write when I am at home in Saint Tropez, on the balcony.

Please tell us a little about your writing – for example genre, title, etc.

I write LGBT-themed fiction – the Zac Tremble Investigates series – he’s the gay PI; and the Life & Times of Johnny Sante series – he’s the young bisexual Parisian con-artist.

In 2014, I began writing with Alp. First we did Dust Jacket and then The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries – the gay, crime fighting duo of Inspector Alfred Fenchurch and PC Adam Cowley. I would like to write something different – maybe Sci-fi but I am also keen to produce either Zac or Johnny as a graphic novel series.

Where do you find inspiration?

The inspiration for the Zac series really came from the series of short novels which Le Monde publishes each summer – pocket-sized, fast-paced reads. Alp says James Bond meets Fawlty Towers – I love both. Johnny is partly inspired by John Cusack’s character in The Grifters; Zac partly by the film Renaissance (with Daniel Craig) and Zac and Paul partly by the relationship between Lola and Manni in Run Lola Run.

Do you have a favourite character? If so why?

I like Paul in Zac Tremble Investigates and Adam in The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries because they are quiet heroes. I love Johnny because he has the spirit I would really loved to have had when I was his age.

Do you have a character you dislike? If so why?

Not exactly dislike – I create bad guys so that my heroes can despatch them.

Are your characters based on real people?

A little of everyone – all of the characters are really studies of human nature – I study cultural anthropology.

Have you ever used a person you don’t/didn’t like as a character then killed them off?

Not in the sense that the person was someone I knew/know personally.

Research can be important in world-building, how much do you need to do for your books? Do you enjoy this aspect of creating a novel and what are your favourite resources?

I have to do a lot of research because first, English is my second language – and English humour is not like French humour so Zac incurs me in lots of studying – old TV sitcoms are very rich material. Fenchurch is based in the 1930s. I use the internet a lot of course and I am lucky that I have access to some magazine archives.

Is there a message conveyed within your writing?  Do you feel this is important in a book?

Always a study of an aspect of our nature – it is important for me because the story would be thin without it. I wanted to create a different kind of gay male character – role models are very important – as is diversity – there isn’t enough diversity in our genre hence why I created Johnny and have him be bisexual – also Cindy and Delphes in Zac – the lesbian couple.

Sort these into order of importance: Great characters; great world-building; solid plot; technically perfect. Can you explain why you chose this order? (Yes I know they all are important…)

Character, character, character and character … nothing else matters.

In what formats are your books available? (E-books, print, large print audio) Are you intending to expand these and if not, what is the reason?

All of my titles are available as eBooks – in all formats – and some are going to be produced as audiobooks. I want to produce Zac as a graphic novel or animated web series – probably Johnny too.

Do you self-edit? If so why is that the case? Do you believe a book suffers without being professionally edited?

I have to have my work thoroughly checked because of the translation aspect – I could not publish anything without my editors.

Do you think indie/self-published authors are viewed differently to traditionally published authors? Why do you think this might be?

Yes; it is sadly the case that traditional publishers are very risk averse – they go with the sure bet but they miss great opportunity by doing it.

Do you read work by self-published authors?

A lot and more and more.

What three pieces of advice would you give to new writers?

Get inside your character’s skin and live his life if you want to write great characters; read to be a better writer; don’t play safe …

What are your best marketing/networking tips? What are your worst?

Twitter. Fortunately, Alp does our social media for us – I am terrible at updating my blog – but I am older than my colleagues at The Project.

Most authors like to read, what have you recently finished reading? Did you enjoy it?

We by Yevgeny Zanyatin

Two Night Stand Ellis Carrington

The Secret Agent Joseph Conrad

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Anne Bronte

I struggle with some of the stuff I get recommended to me – I like comics best – especially Largo Winch.

Can you name your favourite traditionally published author? And your favourite indie/self-published author?

Traditional published author would be Georges Simenon

What are your views on authors offering free books?

We all do it but it is madness!

Do you have a favourite movie?

The Good Thief with Nick Nolte.

Book links, website/blog and author links:

Book links – http://carterseagrove.weebly.com/books-by-our-authors.html

Website/blog – http://chambersmars.weebly.com

Author links – use the book links – above – (a new gallery we have created) to find all of the links to the other author/retail links

The publishing house – www.carterseagrove.weebly.com,

on Twitter @carterseagrove

and on Facebook www.facebook.com/thecarterseagroveproject.

Author Interview Eighty-Six – Alp Mortal (Carter Seagrove) – Thriller/LGBT Fiction

Welcome to Alp Mortal

BIO

Born in 1965, I’m English by birth from the Isle of Wight, living in Newport, spending part of the year in France in the stunningly beautiful department of Haute-Saône in the Franche Comté region. It is heavily forested and very tranquil but the winters are pretty harsh and my home is 820 metres above sea level so I get plenty of snow.

I am also spending increasing amounts of time in the USA, co-managing The Carter Seagrove Project LLC – an independent publishing house, incorporated in the State of Indiana.

I will be 50 years old in 2015. I only started writing in 2009, proving, I suppose, that it is never too late. I didn’t think about self-publishing until late 2012, now, more than two years later, I’m even more energized by the process than ever before.

I’m a qualified English teacher, specializing in teaching English as a second language (TEFL), though I don’t do much of that now. In the distant past, I taught software skills. In the very distant past, I was a project manager on big IT projects and at the very beginning of my career, I was an Internal Auditor. I have degrees in Internal Auditing, Computer Auditing, and Project Management. I’m studying for my degree in Sustainable Development at the moment. Renewable energy is what really interests me and I generate my own power at home via a solar panel.

I’m a member of The Society of Authors, The Society for Editors and Proofreaders, and The Independent Author Network. I am a Smashwords Author and a Goodreads Author.

I grow some of my own food and from Easter to the end of October, I’m outside for the largest part of the day, tending the garden. I write in the evening and during the winter when there is very little else to do. I have no great philosophy except “energy follows intention” and “honour your gifts”. These two principles keep me sane, very happy and exceedingly busy!

Together with Chambers Mars, I am half of Carter Seagrove, author of Dust Jacket and The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries.

Alp Mortal, Chambers Mars and Shannon M. Kirkland are The Carter Seagrove Project LLC – an independent book publisher. Find us at www.carterseagrove.weebly.com, on Twitter @carterseagrove and on Facebook www.facebook.com/thecarterseagroveproject.

Q&A

Where do you live and write from? Currently, I am split between four centers of fiction writing worship: The Isle of Wight, UK in the town of Newport; in the mountains of the Vosges in Haute Saone, France, and in Indiana, USA, where I stay with Shannon from time to time. I also spend time in St Tropez with Chambers – usually if we’re getting a Fenchurch Mystery ready for publication.

Living this way really helps to keep me topped up with ideas for new stories – travel broadens the mind … and the vocabulary!

Please tell us a little about your writing – for example genre, title, etc. I write m/m romance, m/m/f romance very occasionally, m/m romantic thrillers, and gay-themed crime stories and series (mostly with Chambers Mars when we write as Carter Seagrove). I am just about to start my first Sci-fi project which is also gay themed (Trojan Horse – a kind of Space Opera). I have a gay-themed soap opera (Swallow Close) on the table but that is languishing due to project overload. At some point in 2015, I hope to output a series of poems based around the themes of Metaphysics, Gestalt Theory, Solipsism and Synesthesia – themes which occur in my stories too.

I shuttle between stories of varying length and style – epic fantasy sagas alongside very brief encounters, poetry and things which are essentially plays.

Where do you find inspiration? Inspiration comes from everywhere – it’s why travel is so important to me. I find that a lot of the energy for a story comes from my own experiences and relationships. There is a lot of me in each story. The things I study the most also feed into stories – ecology, art, cooking, veganism, Buddhism, social history, evolution, mythology, fast cars, poetry (especially John Donne, Andrew Marvel and Coleridge), Metaphysics, Gestalt Theory, Synesthesia and Solipsism. Fundamentally, I find the greatest source of inspiration to be the idea that a set of words can influence how a person feels and thinks – that suggests a very deep connection and a privileged one too.

Do you have a favourite character? If so why? Cicero in Dabs of Blue, Casper in Guiltless Trip, Inspector Alfred Fenchurch in The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries, Daniel in Daniel’s Garden, Archie in Brave, Alfie in A Lifelong Love and Jason in The Weaver & The Loom – because they represent the best of humanity … and that doesn’t mean always just good – neither are they the most complex (Emile in Juxtaposition) or the simplest (Adam in Camping Gear) – they offer a kind of optimism.

Do you have a character you dislike? If so why? Ben in Juxtaposition; Fulshard in The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries, Lawrence in Guiltless Trip, Anthony in Brave, Pierre in Love On The Beach – they exist to fulfil a purpose – to highlight the good in someone else – to provide the motivation to act in a certain way, to engender an emotional response. I haven’t created a character that I began to dislike – sometimes I become ambivalent about a character – sometimes I elevate a character to play a part which I did not anticipate at the start – most notably Gus and Jacob in Brave.

Are your characters based on real people? All of the characters are based on real people to one extent or another – some of them I know well, others, less so.

Have you ever used a person you don’t/didn’t like as a character then killed them off? Yes …

Research can be important in world-building, how much do you need to do for your books? Do you enjoy this aspect of creating a novel and what are your favourite resources? I love research – ferreting around out of way places and musty old bookshops. How much I research I need to do depends on the story – The Inspector Fenchurch Mysteries takes place in the 1930s, so that took a lot. Some stories are written straight out of my memory of a particular place – Guiltless Trip, Consequences, Camping Gear. The Internet is absolutely invaluable to me – Wikipedia & YouTube probably most – often Google Maps.

Is there a message conveyed within your writing?  Do you feel this is important in a book? Always a message – I can’t write something which does not have a ‘point’ – it is fundamental to the process of creating a story – before the characters are drawn oftentimes. It provides the energy, motivation, realism and hook.

Sort these into order of importance: Great characters; great world-building; solid plot; technically perfect. Can you explain why you chose this order? (Yes I know they all are important…) Great Characters, Solid Plot, Great World Building, Technically Perfect

I am a storyteller – and love reading stories – but I remember the characters and prefer to create characters because I am turned on by people. Great characters can compensate for a thinner plot – a great plot can never compensate for badly drawn characters. I prefer as a reader – and for the reader – to build the world themselves – I hate too much detail – I want to use my imagination. Technically perfect – of course – but not to the detriment of getting the story told – my editor hates me!

In what formats are your books available? (E-books, print, large print audio) Are you intending to expand these and if not, what is the reason? All of my titles are available as eBooks – in all formats – and some are going to be produced as audiobooks. Print is too costly and the retail pricing model doesn’t work these days in the face of eBook pricing. I used to offer all of them in print and sold zip, so took them off of the shelf.

Do you self-edit? If so why is that the case? Do you believe a book suffers without being professionally edited? I used to; I don’t anymore. Yes, a book suffers. When I look at the mistakes I made and left unchecked in early stuff which I did self-edit, I cringe. I realised after a while that you owe your reader at least a script that is as good as it could be, given even the best editor will always miss something. I am blessed with a wonderful editor who takes great pains to make sure the script is ‘worthy’.

Do you think indie/self-published authors are viewed differently to traditionally published authors? Why do you think this might be? Yes. We used to be treated as a joke. Now we’re getting some kudos. We represent the new construct, are closer to our readers, are better at social media and get books published quicker. I see a lot of negative press but discount it because I have exercised a choice in being a self-published author – we have freedom and control our output. If someone believes that a trad’ published author is the only kind or the ‘real’ kind or the ‘best’ kind then they are missing out on great reads.

Do you read work by self-published authors? 90% of my contemporary fiction reads are from self-published authors.

What are your opinions about authors commenting on reviews? How important are reviews? I used to get hooked on them and upset by bad ones – now I never read them. You can’t influence the outcome once the book has gone out there – I’d rather devote the energy to writing the next story.

When buying a book do you read the reviews? Sometimes but they do not always influence my decision to purchase.

What three pieces of advice would you give to new writers? Write, write and write … leave the editing to the editor. Enjoy the process or quit. Respect your professional and artistic integrity and respect your reader.

What are your best marketing/networking tips? What are your worst? Website – blog – Twitter – be Goodreads active – put your product everywhere – advertise on All Romance eBooks and Prism Book Alliance – have a profile everywhere – enter competitions – comment on blog posts

Worst – paid boosts of posts on Facebook

Most authors like to read, what have you recently finished reading? Did you enjoy it? The Good Earth by Pearl S Buck

Atonement by Ian McEwan

Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare

Assignment to Disaster by Edward S Aarons

Strange Conflict by Dennis Wheatley

The Romance of Tristran & Iseult retold by Joseph Bedier

Stripped Expectations by James Lee Hard

The Twelve Chairs by Ilf and Eugene Petrov

Lexington Black by Savannah Smythe

Wondering, The Way by Luke F D Marsden

Jonathan’s Hope by Hans M Hirschi

I read rapaciously – I am aroused by the way a series of words invokes an emotional response – I read all of the packaging on the food I buy – it’s fascinating!

Can you name your favourite traditionally published author? And your favourite indie/self-published author? Trad = too difficult to choose one but would have to be Emile Zola (dead) / Stephen R Donaldson (alive)

Indie = too difficult to choose one but Dill Pickles

What are your views on authors offering free books? It is a necessary evil – I do – without a free offering there is zero chance anyone is going to take a chance on you if they don’t know you.

Do you have a favourite movie? The Matrix

Can you give us a silly fact about yourself? I was born in 1965 – the population of Asia then, equated to 1000 times the number of words I had written by the time I was 49.

FOR EROTICA AUTHORS

As a writer of erotica have you encountered any prejudice?  How have you dealt with it? Do you write under a pen name? I write erotic romance – as Alp Mortal – that’s me.

Yes; some people think it’s dirty or somehow perverted. I usually ask them if they have watched Brokeback Mountain …

Where do you think the lines are drawn between romance, erotica and porn?  Those lines exist only the reader’s head – for me the line is between the gratuitousness of the sex and whether the characters engage with me and whether there is a point to the story which lasts beyond the orgasm.

Erotica is not a new genre do you think it is becoming more accepted into mainstream reading?It was always accepted into mainstream reading – the difference now is that more people admit to reading it.

 

Book links, website/blog and author links:

Book links – http://carterseagrove.weebly.com/books-by-our-authors.html

Website/blog – http://alpmortal.weebly.com

Author links – use the book links – above – (a new gallery we have created) to find all of the links to the other author/retail links

 

The publishing house – http://www.carterseagrove.weebly.com,

on Twitter @carterseagrove

and on Facebook www.facebook.com/thecarterseagroveproject.

 

 

 

Author Interview Number Eighty One – John Paul Wohlschied – Detective Fiction

Welcome to John Paul Wohlschied 

Where are you from and where do you live now? The answer to both is Grand Rapids, Michigan. USA

Please tell us a little about your writing – for example genre, title, etc. I have self-published two books so far. In December 2013, I published Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth, my take on the post-WW2 hard-boiled detective genre. It involves a detective named Benny Cahill, a dead jockey, a fixed horse race, and a pile of money. After I published it, someone suggested that I published a collection of stories with the same main character. So, last month I published Trouble is my Client, a collection of four new Benny Cahill stories. In this book, Cahill deals with a scuffle over a rich man’s will, a radio actor receiving death threats, a bank robbery and a dead scientist.

Where do you find inspiration? I’m a big fan of radio shows from the 30s-50s, known as the golden age of radio. I also enjoy older films, especially comedies and detective shows. I also do a lot of reading on a wide range of topics, history, technology, religion.

Do you have a favourite character? If so why? Not really. I have hundreds of characters in stories both published and not, so it’s almost impossible to pick out one.

Do you have a character you dislike? If so why? Yes, the ones that make me work the hardest.

Have you ever used a person you don’t/didn’t like as a character then killed them off? No. I’ve read of other authors doing that, but I’ve never had to.

Is there a message conveyed within your writing?  Do you feel this is important in a book? When I took English Lit in college, my prof asked us what message Phillip Marlowe was trying to get across in The Big Sleep. I thought to myself, “I don’t know, I just enjoyed the story.” To be honest I don’t think stories need a message. If anything, the message of all my detective stories is the same: “crime doesn’t pay.”

Sort these into order of importance: Great characters; great world-building; solid plot; technically perfect. Can you explain why you chose this order? (Yes I know they all are important…) Solid plot, great characters, great world building, and technically perfect. Plot is the most important part. If you don’t have plot, you don’t have anything. After plot, you need great characters to make the plot work. I don’t do a lot of world building, I just drop hints. If can get everything technically correct, that’s great but sometimes you need your character to use something from a different time. The plot comes before being technically correct.

In what formats are your books available? (E-books, print, large print audio) Are you intending to expand these and if not, what is the reason?Currently, all my published stories are available as ebooks. Right now I don’t have any plans to expand into other formats. I’m busy writing and ebooks are a cheap way to publish.

Do you self-edit? If so why is that the case? Do you believe a book suffers without being professionally edited? I do some self-editing, but I have a couple of people who help me out. It probably helps to hire someone to do the editing professionally, but you don’t always need it. Just have some friends who are good with grammar take a look at it.

Do you read work by self-published authors? Yep. I trawl Smashwords and check out the latest releases from time to time.

What are your opinions about authors commenting on reviews? How important are reviews? It can helpful, if the author needs to clarify something that the reviewer didn’t understand or like. But it can be a problem if the author doesn’t know how to take criticism and it turns into a shouting match. Reviews can help inform future readers.

What experiences can a book provide that a movie or video game cannot?Books can provide better imagery and more story that both movies and video games can’t provide. I mean, quite often when they make the movie version of a book, they leave a lot of information out or condense it. Also, some battle scenes may look great on the big screen, but in the mind’s eye they can look even bigger and cooler.

Most authors like to read, what have you recently finished reading? Did you enjoy it? I finished reading my friend’s book, Chasing Liberty. It is a great book with suspense and an enjoyable main character.

Do you have a favourite movie? When I was younger, I almost wore out a VHS copy of Disney’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

Do you have any pets? No. Used to have an outside cat, but he left.

Mystery story blog: http://maninfedora.tumblr.com/

Returning Author Juliet B Madison – Thriller/Crime Best Served Cold Blog Tour

I’d like to welcome back author Juliet B Madison as part of the Best Served Cold Blog Tour

Please recap briefly about your books:

I have written five UK based Police procedural novels and 2 volumes of novellas about my detective creation DI Frank Lyle. The novels already published are Second Chances, Heir to Misfortune, Unholy Alliance, Murder in the Wings and Best served Cold, which was released this week after being available for pre-order since August.. The books are set in the 1980s and early 1990s when forensic science wasn’t advanced as today and people actually talked to each other without computers, ipads and cell phones.

Give us a bit of information about your primary character(s).

DI Frank Lyle is five months short of his fiftieth birthday at the beginning of the latest release, Best Served Cold.  He is dedicated to truth and getting justice for those with no voice. He is a devoted father and family man and even gets on well with his ex wife, Sarah, these days. In the last book Frank’s adult son, James, came out and is a relationship with one his father’s junior officers, DS Thomas Fox. Frank and his current wife, Jayseera, are very supportive of James & Thomas’ relationship.

Sort these into order of importance: Great characters; great world-building; solid plot; technically perfect. Can you explain why you chose this order? (Yes I know they all are important…)

In terms of crime fiction I believe a solid plot MUST come first. Great characters second because if you can’t like and believe in the detective solving the case then your readers will lose interest. You also have to portray interesting criminal types to keep the reader guessing. In terms of police procedurals you have to be technically and forensically accurate, for example there would be a real faux pas in describing DNA analysis in a crime novel set in the 1960s. World building, well I have developed the fictional city of Ashbeck over the course of the novels and if you’re writing in a series you can build. If you’re writing a stand-alone then world building would be higher on the list. so my order goes Solid plot, great characters, technically perfect and great world-building.

Do you self-edit? If so why is that the case? Do you believe a book suffers without being professionally edited?

My good friend, Katrina Bowlin-Mackenzie, edits my work for nothing because I can’t afford professional editing services. I have seen glaring errors in some traditionally published books as all writers and editors are fallible. I don’t know where I’d be without Katrina to be honest because she spots so many things I miss.

Do you think indie/self-published authors are viewed differently to traditionally published authors? Why do you think this might be?

Yeah, people tend to look down their snotty noses at Indie/self published authors, but anyone waiting to be snapped up by the so called Big 5 will have a long wait. Just because Indie’s don’t get 6 figure advances, in house publicity teams and 20 book contracts doesn’t mean we write less well. The Fifty Shades of Shit oops I mean grey trilogy is proof that traditional publishers don’t always know poor quality when they read it. And just don’t let me get started on Kobogate…

Do you read work by self-published authors?

Apart from the odd Agatha Christie or Peter Robinson I rarely read much else. My favourite Indie writers include John Holt, Gerry McCullough, Tricia Drammeh, David Menon, Tom Winton, Kristen Stone and Malika Gandhi.

What aspect of writing do you least enjoy? Why might this be?

The blurb is probably the worst bit as it’s a fine line between enticing the reader and giving too much away.

What are your best marketing/networking tips? What are your worst?

Be visible on social media, start your own Facebook pages about your characters or series, interview other authors on your blog. Have eye catching cover designs. My friend, John Holt (author of the brilliant Tom Kendall Private Detective series)  has designed all the DI Frank Lyle Mystery series covers. People who don’t help out others by sharing and tweeting their work can be hard to contend with as it should be a two-way street. It can be hard, but try not let bad reviews drag you down and keep moaning about them, okay so the reviewer probably only read the free sample, it’s their loss so move on. I don’t think I have any worst tips.

When buying a book do you read the reviews?

No, because they’re just one person’s opinion. I go by the product description, if I like the sound of the book from that I buy it.

Can you name your worst job? Do you think you learned anything from the position that you now use in your writing?

Yes, my current office cleaning job. Well I base descriptions of untidy people’s residences on the crap I have to clean up on a week nightly basis but you just can’t learn from a job that kills about 6,000 brain cells a minute due to acute lack of mental stimulation.

What are your plans for the future? When will we see your next book?  Tell us about it.

I have made a start on the next full length DI Lyle book Dead on Arrival, which should be out in the late spring. I am also working on a DI Lyle novella, A Murder-free Christmas, which will be available to pre-order from mid November. I’m also working to promote Best served Cold. This is the blurb.

.. DI Lyle is about to get a glimpse into the murky world of political activism and hate crime; the murder of a prominent city councillor is just the tip of the iceberg.

The city of Ashbeck is on high alert when news breaks that convicted triple murderer and paedophile Bob Kenyon has escaped from custody.

Can DI Lyle and his team get to the bottom of this murky mess before another atrocity occurs?

You can buy Best Served Cold

http://bookshow.me/B00MRIZQRU

You can catch up with Juliet B Madison

Blog:  http://julietmadisoncrimeauthor.wordpress.com/

Twitter @JulietBMadison

Facebook      There are a number of DI Lyle related pages on Facebook but here is a small selection.

https://www.facebook.com/servedcold/

https://www.facebook.com/Lylefanzunited/

https://www.facebook.com/JulietMadisonCrimeAuthor/

https://www.facebook.com/TheDIFrankLyleMysterySeries/

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Book Review – The Bard’s Daughter – Historical Mystery

The Bard’s Daughter – Historical fiction/mystery

4 stars

This was fairly short – a teaser for the later novels I believe, but was still enjoyable in its own right. Set in Medieval Wales it follows Gwen – the titular character who must save her father from a charge of murder. Some of the laws and traditions of Wales and the Norman lords appear, albeit with not a great deal of detail but it is a short book. The author covers a little more in an interesting appendix.

The character of Gwen is interesting, for although Wales had more equality for women at that time she is still seen as lesser by then men, but steps up and shows them what she can do. Solving the murder they cannot or will not. A love interest is mentioned, but he is absent in the book, and enough of a teaser is given that the reader is intrigued to find out if they are reunited in later books. Other characters mentioned are based on real figures, and it is obvious the author has done some research into the period and area. Although the scenes only take place around one specific location – a castle – I didn’t feel more was needed.

In a similar vein to the Cadfael books this historical mystery is entertaining – especially without the modern knowledge of forensics, or such like. Recommended as short story for fans of the genre, and fans of Welsh fiction. I shall definitely be reading more by this author.