New Release – Might Have Been – Tales and Retales Bundle #Fantasy #Fairytales #adultfairytales #bundles

Might Have Been – Tales and Retales

only 5.99 for all 17 stories!

From retellings of classic fairy tales to legends and lore told around the hearth, this collection presents stories of wonder and fantasy—some straight up and others with a twist.

Children’s tales from Serbia and Russia feature water spirits and household sprites, knight princes and giants, whirlwinds and the Golden Horde.

An unusual visit to Wonderland follows Alice as she encounters the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, and Humpty Dumpty under horror’s shadow. The secrets of a most infamous castle, Burg Frankenstein, deliver up ghosts.

While a trio of sexy gender-swap tales yield Snow White, Red Riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast with spice.

Romeo and Juliet—and vampires, the Three Little Pigs as you’ve never seen them, Cinderella embracing witchcraft…these are the Might Have Been, folklore, granny tales, and fairy tales turned upside down or glimpsed darkly in the mirror.

*Not all stories suitable for kids.

Might bundle cover UPDATED JPG.jpg

https://books2read.com/MightHaveBeenTalesRetales

https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/might-have-been-2

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0813VKLYG/?tag=kydala-20

https://books.apple.com/us/book/id1486609937

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/might-have-been-a-l-butcher/1134771863

https://bundlerabbit.com/b/might-have-been-tales-retales

  1. Fairy Tale Fatesby Leah Cutter
  2. The Charming Trilogy Vol. 1 by Kristine Grayson
  3. The Legends of Castle Frankenstein by DeAnna Knippling
  4. Snow Truer Loveby AJ Tipton
  5. Brick Houses (Uncollected Anthology: Fairy Tales) by Annie Reed
  6. The Return of Alice by Robert Jeschonek
  7. Into the Forest Shadows by J.A. Marlow
  8. Handsome and the Beast by AJ Tipton
  9. THE RUSSIAN STORY BOOK – 12 Illustrated Children’s Stories from Mother Russia by Richard Wilson
  10. Tales of Old Giralliyaby J.M. Ney-Grimm
  11. R+J Sucks, vol 1 by Ann Hunter
  12. Hunting Red by AJ Tipton
  13. Lost: Cinderella’s Secret Witch Diaries (Book 1)by Ron Vitale
  14. Return to Wonderland by Tanya Lisle
  15. Fairy Tales Revisited on Silvery Earthby Barbara G.Tarn
  16. Redd’s Hoodie by Karen C. Klein
  17. HERO TALES AND LEGENDS OF THE SERBIANS – over 80 Serbian tales and legends by Woislav M. Petrovitch

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Review – A Sword’s Poem – Leah Cutter

Review – A Sword’s Poem – Leah Cutter

https://amzn.to/2LuiVmc

#Fantasy #Fairytale #Japanese

When Hikaru’s new husband is murdered by a wicked sorcerer, his soul stolen and forged into a mystic sword she risks all to find her love. Magic, betrayal, courage and love weave an intricate tale in Heian-era Japan; the author spins the world beautifully – as seen by the fox-fairy, and the human heroine. This is a tale of love, sacrifice, revenge and self-understanding – but more than that it’s a wonderful fairy-tale set against a background with which many Western readers will be unfamiliar. Ms Cutter brings this world to life, and its vibrancy and ritualism are everywhere in the story. Poetry features everywhere, and the language is very lyrical. I can imagine sitting around a campfire as someone recounts this as a heroic tale and getting totally caught up in it.

It’s primarily told from the point of view of the female characters – in a largely male-oriented world, which makes a nice change. These women are powerful, resourceful, braver than the men (in many cases), dutiful and self-reliant and such characters bring this sword and sorcery tale to life.

Recommended! 5 Stars

Swords Poem

New Release! Here Be Fairies Bundle

OUT NOW!!!!!!

Here Be Fairies Bundle

https://bundlerabbit.com/b/here-be-fairies

Universal Link https://books2read.com/HereBeFairies

Amazon https://amzn.to/2GTpU6V

Amazon UK https://amzn.to/2HvhsYD

Kobo https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/here-be-fairies

Barnes and Noble http://bit.ly/2EFK3rd

I-books https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1370755892

Fairies, fair folk, imps, trolls, and pixies—they haunt our myths from Ireland to Iceland and everywhere else. Join in the fairy fun, or fairy fear, as good, bad, and mischievous they show themselves. Dare you take the trip to Fairyland? No one who returns is ever quite the same.

A 13 -book fairy bundle.

Fairy bundle cov

Featuring:

 

Flower Fairies by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Bride Thief by Brigid Collins

Feyland by Anthea Sharp

Phouka by Liz Pierce

The Giving Year by Alexandra Brandt

Summerland’s Paladin by Diana Benedict

Real Girl by Leslie Claire Walker

The Troll’s Belt by J.M. Ney-Grimm

The Clockwork Fairy Kingdom by Leah Cutter

The Kitchen Imps by A. L. Butcher

Faerie Fruit by Charlotte E. English

By Winter’s Forbidden Rite by DeAnna Knippling

Dark Dancer by Jaleta Clegg

fairies boxset

 

Review – Magic for a Rainy Day #fantasy #fairytales

5 stars #fantasy #fairytales

This delightful collection of short stories twists and turns with Celtic magic from Scotland, to Ireland, to Fairyland. Fairytales retold, and with a heart and passion that is apparent in every word. None of the stories is particularly long or heavy; there is a lightness of phrase from the author which is refreshing and fits the ambience of the collection.

I found myself laughing, smiling and recalling tales from old – particularly with the Irish tale of Banoffee Pie and Black Pudding. This is a fine tale of fairy gifts and being careful what one wishes for.

The last tale –They Stole My Love Last Night was poignantly told, sad and moving with a bittersweet ending. It was a good finale to the collection.

I’d like to learn more about these characters, especially the half-wyndling Skye, and read more of her adventures. Definitely recommend this to readers of fantasy, fairy tales and mythical stories.

 

Set in Scotland, Ireland, and the Pacific Northwest, these five stories share three things: a little rain, a little fantasy, and a lot of heart.

In “Sidewynd,” Sky Patel balances life between Edinburgh and its mirror in the faerie realm. Until the balance breaks.

In “The Flat Above the Wynd,” Sky’s inherited responsibilities double when past mistakes come back to haunt her.

In “Banoffee Pie and Black Pudding,” Alyssa Granville’s troubles begin with a strange gift from a stranger Irish man.

In “(Not a) Fairy Tale,” a bullied teenage girl learns a startling truth. But fairies don’t go to high school…do they?

In “They Stole My Love Last Night,” Celtic music, fairies, and ghosts collide, turning a bitter story sweet.

The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Tales – New Release

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The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Talessix short tales of mayhem and mischief.

Naughty imps, missing socks, cunning thieves and baffled gods feature in this collection of short fantasy fiction.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DPJ5TQC

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kitchen-Other-Tales-Fire-Side-Collection-ebook/dp/B01DPJ5TQC/

I’m delighted to announce the release of my latest short story collection. The Kitchen Imps and Other Dark Tales is the first in the Fire-Side Tales Collection of short fantasy for all the family. These fairytale-esque short fiction pieces bring us the Kitchen Imps – a naughty race of beings who inhabit the house, causing mischief where ever they go. Ever wondered where socks go when you wash them? Well the Joy of Socks will answer that age-old mystery.

Some of these tales have appeared in anthologies with the Indie Collaboration or Wyrd Worlds but have been revised and expanded for this collection.

Currently only available on Amazon the Kitchen Imps will appear on the Smashwords associated stores shortly and hopefully as an audio book.

There will be more tales from my favourite little rascals so please watch this space.

Cover image Fluenta@Fotolia.com

 

 

Author Interview 106 Segilola Salami – Children’s Author/Fairy Tales

 

I don’t often promote books for kids at the library, but this author’s work intrigued me. The books are bilingual – English and Yoruba, that’s a West African Language spoken by nearly 65 million people.  Anyway if you’d like to learn a little more here is some information about the language and people.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoruba_language

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoruba_people

Over to you Segilola…

Welcome to Segilola Salami

Where are you from and where do you live now? I’m a Londoner living in London

Please tell us a little about your writing – for example genre, title, etc.

I write bilingual children’s books. My titles so far are:

  • Yetunde: The Life and Times of a Yoruba Girl in London
  • Learn to Count in Yoruba and English
  • Yetunde: An Ode to My Mother

Where do you find inspiration? My daughter

Research can be important in world-building, how much do you need to do for your books? Do you enjoy this aspect of creating a novel and what are your favourite resources? I tend to have an idea of the folktales I want to include in my book, so I do a bit of online and offline research, speaking to friends to see what versions they remember. This way I try to get the version I tell as close to accurate as I can. I also add my own twists to it. I do enjoy this because it allows me to relive my childhood.

Is there a message conveyed within your writing?  Do you feel this is important in a book? I think with my stories, there are some moral guides. This is important, as I hope it teaches children that every action we take has a reaction

In what formats are your books available? (E-books, print, large print audio) Are you intending to expand these and if not, what is the reason? All my books are available as ebooks. Only Yetunde: An Ode to My Mother is available as a paperbook. I definitely would consider expanding the formats the books are available in in the future

Do you self-edit? If so why is that the case? Do you believe a book suffers without being professionally edited? I do both. When I write my first draft, I take a good few days away from it. I give the manuscript to beta readers to provide feedback. When I go back to the draft manuscript, I sometimes find that with the way I wrote a paragraph, my intentions were not clearly put across, so I have to re-write it. I also apply any appropriate feedback I get from my beta readers. Then I pass the manuscript to the professional editor. When I get the manuscript back, I re-read the editors versions. I find that because I translate some Yoruba words, if the editor changes some key words, the meaning would be lost. So it is important that I then re-edit the editors version.

Do you think indie/self-published authors are viewed differently to traditionally published authors? Why do you think this might be? As a reader, I don’t think so.

Do you read work by self-published authors? Yes I do

What are your opinions about authors commenting on reviews? How important are reviews? As a reader, I never bothered reading reviews. The only time I give a review is when Amazon sends me an email asking for a review. As a reader reviews are not that important to me (as I may not have the same views as the previous reviewer) for works of fiction. I like to judge for myself. If I find a book is badly written, I won’t give the author a second go. If I enjoyed the first book, I would seek out other books by the same author. For non-fiction, I definitely check out reviews to see what people think of the content.

As an author, reviews are super important to help me improve and be better at my writing and that’s why I have a network of beta readers and other authors who I call on to get their feedback. In marketing my books, I have been told that it is important to have reviews as there are some people who only check out books that have reviews.

I think authors should not comment on any published reviews s/he gets. If the author knows the person, then they can talk about the review privately.

When buying a book do you read the reviews? Only for non-fiction

Book links, website/blog and author links:

Yetunde: An Ode to My Mother

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/603700

Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/1R7OVF3

Amazon US: http://amzn.to/1S7GM66

Book page: http://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/yetunde-an-ode-to-my-mother/

Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/yetunde-an-ode-to-my-mother

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/en/book/yetunde-an-ode-to-my-mother/id1072179529?mt=11

GRs https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28388212-yetunde

 

Yetunde: The Life and Times of a Yoruba Girl in London

Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/1S0AkQ6

Amazon US: http://amzn.to/1KJuXDk

Book trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCMv4wU5sHI

 

Author website: http://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Yetunde3DAnimation/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/iyayetunde1

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/segilolasalami

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7OL37UtAJ-ULNnDGB0SiTg/videos

Google + https://plus.google.com/u/0/+IyaYetunde

Subscribe to Podcast http://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/subscribe-to-podcast/

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-segilola-salami-show/id1091366789?mt=2&ls=1

Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=85447&refid=stpr

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse – Free on Kindle

Until 19th July Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse is free on all the Kindle sites.

This short tale within a tale is a mythic story of monsters, revenge and unwise bargains.

Tales of Erana: The Warrior’s Curse.

http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY

http://www.amazon.de/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.fr/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.it/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.es/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.nl/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.in/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.co.jp/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

http://www.amazon.ca/Tales-Erana-Warriors-Alexandra-Butcher-ebook/dp/B00QZ7PVWY/

Fantasy, Science Fiction and Heroic Literature in our Society – Logan Judy

 Name:  Logan Judy

www.loganjudy.com

http://www.loganjudy.com/newsletter/

www.facebook.com/loganjudyauthor

http://twitter.com/loganrjudy


Location (as I am wondering if it is regional)?
:  Northern Indiana (Remington)

Bio: Logan Judy is a fantasy, science fiction, and dystopia author who began writing when he was 12 years old.  Nine years later, he published his first novel, Finding Sage, and the sequel a year later. He currently lives in Indiana with his wife Rebecca and her Don Quixote-esque guard dog, exploring new worlds and writing new stories.

How do YOU define fantasy/science fiction? Both science fiction and fantasy can be broadly defined as stories existing outside of our own present terms of reality.  Either you have science fiction, granting things plausible but not yet discovered or invented, or you have fantasy, existing outside of plausible reality altogether.  I love that definition because it leaves a great realm of possibilities open to us as writers.  So if I want to write fantasy, I don’t have to stick to wizards, elves, dragons, and vampires; I could create something entirely new!

If you’re a writer how do you portray heroism in your books? The hero as a literary construct has been given a very rigid definition by literary critics: a young person, usually male, who receives a call to action, rises through challenges with the help of a mentor, experiences a metaphorical (or literal) death and rebirth, then returns home to glory while having become a different person through self-knowledge.  It’s neat, clean, and defined.  I don’t like that about it.

When it comes to heroism in my books, I like to concentrate on one theme in particular: sacrifice.  There are many things that can make a hero, including bravery, strength, saving people, and conquering great things, but to me, a hero is someone who will sacrifice themselves for somebody else.  Beyond that, I like to leave it wide open.  So that might fit some or even a lot of those typical definitions, but it also leaves a lot of room open for stories that maybe haven’t been done before in quite the same way.  So you could have the aforementioned scenario, or you could have a young woman who sacrifices herself to save her little brother without the help of a mentor, and without a rebirth or return.  She’s every bit the hero that Frodo is.

It has been argued fantasy is full of ‘tropes’ – what are your views on this? It most definitely is . . . just like every other genre in fiction.  Nearly all romance has a formulaic progression to it, but that doesn’t keep A Walk to Remember from making me cry.  The book about small town wonders has been written scores of times, but that didn’t keep me from thoroughly enjoying Dandelion Wine.  There’s a logical fallacy in assuming that just because there are ‘tropes’ that there’s no originality within that.  Different writers can have different takes on the same ideas and concepts.  Dracula is nothing like Twilight which is nothing like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, yet all feature vampires, so that’s less a criticism than an acknowledgement of classic influences – or at least it should be.  In fact, some of the best and most exciting fantasy I’ve read in recent years have been interesting takes on classic tropes, as opposed to completely new inventions.

How important are ‘facts’ in fantasy/science fiction – does something need to be plausible to be believable? If you substitute the word ‘consistent’ with ‘plausible’ then absolutely it does.  But there’s a great deal of difference between the two.  In science fiction, for example, plausibility is a key part of the appeal.  Classic writers like Jules Verne and George Orwell were so successful because their stories were just close enough to reality to make us imagine that they could be prophetic.  But when it comes to fantasy, we have something different altogether.  That a dark lord could make magic rings and bind everyone to them in a land filled with elves, dwarves, halflings, and orcs is not plausible, and yet Lord of the Rings is enormously successful–because it is consistent.  The rules of the world make sense because of the willing suspension of disbelief.  So the premise of the world in science fiction and fantasy doesn’t necessarily have to be plausible, but internal consistency is non-negotiable.

What science fiction/fantasy has influenced you most?  What would you say the most influential writers/film-makers? I grew up on fantasy, particularly the Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings, as well as more contemporary works such as the Percy Jackson series, Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle, and the Star Wars saga.  But of those, I would only ascribe Lewis as a strong influence on my writing.  Since becoming a young adult, I have been progressively influenced by science fiction and dystopia writers, particularly George Orwell and Ray Bradbury (although the latter of those claims to have written only one science fiction novel, Fahrenheit 451, labeling his other works such as Something Wicked This Way Comes as fantasy).  I especially identify with Ray Bradbury; if you read interviews where he talks about his writing method, that’s exactly how I operate.

Fantasy, Science Fiction and Literary Heroes in Our Society Guest Post – Sharon Kae Reamer

Name: Sharon Kae Reamer

Location (as I am wondering if it is regional)? Expatriate American now living in Cologne, Germany.

How pervasive do you think fantasy/sci-fi is in our society today?  It is all-pervasive in the sense that most everyone has seen a SFF movie. But there are many people I meet who have never read a SF or fantasy book. For example, I know many people who’ve seen The Hobbit trilogy and LoTR films but have never read the books. I’ve encountered quite a few people who have told me, flat out, that they would like to read my books but that they don’t like fantasy. I don’t try to argue with them. To each his/her own.

Why do you think this is?  It suggests that genre literature, in particular, speculative fiction, is still not seen to be something ‘worthy’ as literature. Maybe in some sense it is still perceived as ‘pulp’ fiction or escapist literature. It is escapist literature, but I view ALL literature as escapist. Maybe because fantasy and SF are not perceived to have social relevance to the problems we face in today’s world (or even historically). But I think that’s a huge mistake in perception, at least from my point of view. If done right, the speculative genre can be a fantastic mirror to aspects of our culture on this planet.

Are these genres seen in a more acceptable light than they used to be? Yes, probably, but as stated above, mainly in the media of film and television rather than books. Although in YA, I think anything is possible these days. It seems to be the playground where speculative fiction is most highly tolerated.

What makes a ‘hero’? Would you say this definition is different within literature to real life? A hero is someone who has been forced to abandon his or her ‘normal’ life for a greater purpose, be it saving someone they love, a quest to retrieve a magical or scientific artefact for the force of good, or to battle against a negative force to save the world/universe, just to name a couple examples. There are many definitions of what heroism is or does. It can also be a small thing, like being faithful and waiting for someone to return even if there is no hope of it (Ulysses’ wife Penelope comes to mind here).

Ideally, I don’t see a lot of difference between real life and literature heroes, except that real life heroes do not have to deal with magical or science fictional type situations. Doctors Without Borders is a ‘hero’ in real life because they save people. Superheroes in fiction save people but on a much more extravagant scale. But DWB are superheroes to me in real life. J

If you’re a writer how do you portray heroism in your books? My heroine from The Schattenreich series, Caitlin Schwarzbach, will risk anything to save those she loves. To me, that is heroism. It’s a quiet kind of heroism. She doesn’t want to put herself in danger, but she does because she can’t stand the thought of anything bad happening to those she loves.

How important are ‘facts’ in fantasy/science fiction – does something need to be plausible to be believable? There are two famous quotes I think summarize the differences in how things work in fantasy and science fiction:

“Science fiction is something that could happen – but you usually wouldn’t want it to. Fantasy is something that couldn’t happen – though you often only wish that it could.” Arthur C. Clarke, 2000

“Fantasy is the impossible made probable. Science Fiction is the improbable made possible.” Rod Serling, 1962

In both SF and F, plausibility is a hugely important factor. Otherwise, we cannot take the reader with us. He/she will be left standing in the wizard’s laboratory/launch pad while we go merrily off alone (cackling madly and collecting cats) into the worlds we have built. As a reader, I have to believe that whatever is going on on the page is plausible, be it giant space worms or man-eating unicorns or intelligent slime mold. These things may or may not exist (i.e., they are not ‘facts’ in any sense in the world we live in at present), but if they are presented to be an integral and logical part of the world the author has built, in other words, plausible, then I will accept their existence in that world as ‘fact’ .

What science fiction/fantasy has influenced you most?  What would you say the most influential writers/film-makers? I came of age in relation to science fiction and fantasy reading in the early eighties. Many of those writers are ones that I still think of fondly. Isaac Asimov, Roger Zelazny, Ursula K. LeGuin, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Poul Anderson, Larry Niven, William Gibson, Lewis Carroll, Frank Herbert, Douglas Adams. Andre Norton, Marion Zimmer Bradley. I could go on for a long time. I don’t know if all their works would still hold up now if I read them again. But it doesn’t matter. They were influential in making me a reader of speculative fiction, and so remain very influential.

In relation to films, I’d guess T.O.S.S. that my parents let me watch (my younger brother was not allowed to watch it when the series first came out). I was riveted from the very first episode of Star Trek, and still love the concept. I instantly fell in love with the original Star Wars trilogy as well as the first three Indiana Jones films and simply could not wait for the sequels to come out. It was excruciating. There was also 2001, and a slew of others since then. There were also those weird fantasy/horror films, many or most of them black and white films, I remember from my childhood that influenced me a great deal (most of which I saw on television): The 5000 Fingers of Doctor T, The Haunting, all those monster movies, most of which I watched with my Dad – The Werewolf was probably the scariest to me – and Invaders From Mars, any Outer Limits or Twilight Zone episode, The Wizard of Oz, Godzilla and Mothra – these were all influential to me growing up. My Dad still enjoys trying to get me to watch films that will scare the crap out of me when I visit him. I’m usually a willing participant, but I sometimes regret it afterwards when I’m trying to get to sleep. The first film I ever saw in the movies was 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea with Kirk Douglas and James Mason which my grandfather took me to see. It made a huge impression on me.

Nowadays, the fantastical or science fictional movie has loads of special effects and is presented so realistically that if I were a kid growing up today, I’d be hooked on SFF all over again.

Fairy-tales, anthropomorphic personifications, mythical beasts and cultural fantastical persons are all about us – such as Santa Claus, St George, dragons and fairies – how vital are these for our identity? Are we who we are because of the myths our cultures hold? My Schattenreich series contains Celto-Germanic deities. Some of the deities portrayed and characterized are purely Celtic. Some have crossover status (i.e., they exist in both the Celtic and Germanic pantheons). My interpretations of these fantastical persons, as such, are vital to the identity and worldviews of the characters in my series. Because the religions I portray do not exist any longer in the modern world in their original form, I don’t really know how important they are to our identity. But because there are a large number of neopagan or modern pagan religions that use some of these divinities in their practice, I believe they have relevance to who we are, even if it is just in recognizing the god/goddess within us. Most of us who have some sort of northern European ancestry can probably relate to the fantastical portrayal of the Celtic and Germanic pantheon. This has continued from early historical times (i.e., during the late Iron Age) right up until the present. I don’t believe in any fantastical creatures, although I think they are important as they give us the means to learn something about ourselves and have formed the basis for our modern culture. In other parts of the world, ancient religions populated with one or more deities are still important to the identity of the cultures. And much of this representation is based on myths, even for the major religions (even those with only a monotheistic pantheon) of the modern world.

So I would say the answer to the second question is: yes, totally.

Here’s some links:

 

http://www.sharonreamer.com/ (website)

http://sharonreamer.blogspot.com (redirects to sharonreamer.blogspot.de)

https://www.facebook.com/sharon.k.reamer

https://twitter.com/sharonkae

http://www.pinterest.com/sharonkreamer/

 

The books in The Schattenreich series (published) are Primary Fault, Shaky Ground, Double Couple, and Shadow Zone. Forthcoming in summer, 2015: Triple Junction (final book)

Primary Fault has been honoured with a Indy B.R.A.G. medallion and Indie Book of the Day.

 

 

 

Fantasy, Science Fiction and Literary Heroes in our Society – Thaddeus White

Today I am pleased to welcome back Thaddeus White, fantasy author for a guest post on my feature for 2015.  Here are his views on fantasy in society, and its influences.

Name: Thaddeus White

Location (as I am wondering if it is regional)? England

Are these genres seen in a more acceptable light than they used to be? I think that this is definitely the case. Superheroes are utterly dominating cinema and are starting to make headway on TV as well. The Lord of the Rings/Hobbit films (and Harry Potter) have enjoyed immense success, as has (and will) Star Wars. Game of Thrones is hugely popular as well. Sci-fi and fantasy aren’t niche anymore, they’re mainstream.

I think the shift has occurred for several reasons. CGI allows a truer rendition on-screen of what happens in books, and there’s increasing awareness that fantasy isn’t necessarily fairytales and elves (the rise of grimdark). This means that those into gritty and grim stuff can find much to enjoy in fantasy. As geeks have inherited the earth, it’s helped to make science fiction cooler.

There’s also a natural ebb and flow to what happens to be ‘in’. Right now, sci-fi and fantasy are doing well, but sooner or later fashion will shift.

It has been argued fantasy is full of ‘tropes’ – what are your views on this?There are many fantasy tropes, but this isn’t limited to this one genre. The flood myth and dragons are commonplace in religion and old legends, and how often is a spy also a ladies man? Tropes can be overused to make something boring and generic, but they can also be handy pegs, shorthand to let readers know something without having to detail it (eg dwarf = short, probably bearded, may well have an axe, likes a drink).

Fantasy and science fiction used to be seen as very male-oriented, do you think this is still the case. Do you have any experience of this? [Disclaimer: I am a chap]. I think it’s far less the case than it was, and it’s important to note that other genres are female-oriented (romantic fiction, for example). A potential issue with fantasy, set either in a medieval or a largely realistic medievalish world, is that there wasn’t gender equality, so the stories are often male-dominated. Women can of course have roles in commerce, religion and magic, but (keeping to medieval norms) it’s hard to give them common roles in warfare or political power. It’s impossible to impose modern gender norms on a world aspiring to be the equivalent of, say, 14th century England.

Sci-fi’s an entirely different kettle of fish, because you can make a sci-fi society credibly equal, or even matriarchal in nature. Shifting Starbuck from a male to a female character in Battlestar Galactica was a credible change.

How important are ‘facts’ in fantasy/science fiction – does something need to be plausible to be believable? I think internal consistency is critical to credibility. People will suspend disbelief for magic or advanced technology beyond anything possible today, but they will never believe a world or universe where the author contradicts his own tenets. So long as an author adheres to the rules that are established, there’s no problem.

What science fiction/fantasy has influenced you most?  What would you say the most influential writers/film-makers? It’s interesting you mention those, because one of the biggest influences on me was the videogame Vagrant Story (came out about a decade and a half ago now). It had a phenomenally good translation to English (it was originally in Japanese), and Alexander O. Smith deserves huge credit for the translation. It’s almost Shakespearean, and, (as well as English), French, German and Latin are mingled together to give the city of Lea Monde, and the wider world, a deeper sense of history. It was an inspiration for me when I was doing the extensive world-building behind my first book, Bane of Souls.

Another major influence, albeit in a smaller way, was the BBC adaptation of The Chronicles of Narnia. There’s one specific moment I shan’t spoil that, as a young child, made me realise just how exciting fantasy could be.

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