Winter Warmer on Sale – Last Few Weeks!

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Winter Warmer Bundle

Tales of the Seasons – volume 1

Winter bundle cover (2)

https://www.books2read.com/Winterwarmer

https://bundlerabbit.com/b/winter-warmer

Get it now before it vanishes!

Last few weeks and only $3.99!

Winter – A time of festivity, of hardship, and cold. Perhaps it remains the most superstitious of seasons and for many the most beloved. Snow, feasting, gifts, religious importance, family and getting together. And of storytelling!

Thirteen tales set in, or about, the harshest season. From witches, winter realms and faery kings, to snowmen who build winter people of meat, to heroes battling to save a friend, and detectives trying to solve wintery crimes and mysteries, to Christmas romance there is something for everyone in this winter warmer.

Book #1:

Sanctuary

Book #2:

Snowman’s Chance in Hell

Book #3:

Tollard’s Peak

Book #4:

Phoenix

Book #5:

The Tuxedoed Man

Book #6:

Nutball Season

Book #7:

The Dreamweaver’s Journey

Book #8:

Dark Dancer

Book #9:

Coconutty Christmas

Book #10:

Nobody’s Child

Book #11:

Freak Sanctuary

Book #12:

Desperate Housewitches

Book #13:

Winter Glory

 

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All You Need is Love – Spotlight and Blog Stop – #Romance #Valentines

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Out Now! All You Need is Love #99cents #GLBT @AdrianaKraft #MFRWAuthor

 

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE BOX COVER

All You Need is Love

A Limited Edition Romance Collection

With stories by

Tamsin Baker, Jess Buffett,‎ Kristine Cayne,‎ Adriana Kraft,‎ Cate Farren,‎ Valerie Ullmer,‎ Kai Tyler,‎ Lexi Thorne,‎ Izzy Szyn,‎ Aeryn Jaden, Dana Kenzi, Celia Fay, and Dani Gray

Romance Collections is proud to present these thirteen stories of love that knows no boundaries. Like rivers flowing through the canvas of earth, these stories will run deep, touch softly and leave you breathless.

No matter who it is with, passion is magnificent, desires are bold, and love is beautiful.

BUY LINKS

Amazon (universal link): http://mybook.to/allyouneedislove

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/all-you-need-is-love-27

iBooks: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/all-you-need-is-love/id1330261438?mt=11

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/all-you-need-is-love-tamsin-baker/1127753593?ean=2940154950586

STORIES

The Omega Shift, by Tamsin Baker

Running in Circles, by Jess Buffett

Burning for Him, by Kristine Cayne

Three: A Love Story, by Adriana Kraft

Stop me Falling, by Cate Farren

Fall for You, by Valerie Ullmer

Homecoming, by Kai Tyler

Lesbian Alien Affairs, by Lexi Thorne

Bound for Landia, by Izzy Szyn

Wide Awake, by Aeryn Jaden

Once Upon a Crush, by Dana Kenzi

The Honest Change, by Celia Fay

Cupid’s Valentine, by Dani Gray

 

BLURB Three: A Love Story by Adriana Kraft

As erotic romance authors, my husband and I love writing ménage and polyamory stories because they offer so many options for sizzling sex scenes. We craft sexual encounters on the page that appeal to both of us in hopes they’ll appeal to the fantasies of other men and women, as well.

But what happens when these hot erotic fantasies run headlong into real-life obstacles? What does polyamory look like when it happens to ordinary people? That’s the challenge we set ourselves in “Three: A Love Story,” our contribution to the Boxed Set All You Need is Love.

 Three lives—but how many loves? Two bisexual women deeply in love with each other also enjoy dating men and even arranging an occasional three-way. What if one of these women starts to fall in love with a man?

EXCERPT

Jamie tilted her head to the side as Susan curled back in next to her. “So what do you think of Mason?”

“Ah, Mason. He’s the source of your stewing. Is he starting to wear on you? How long has it been—three months? Four months?”

“He’s not wearing on me. And it’s nearly five months.” Jamie paused to wet her lips. “You didn’t answer my question. What do you think of him? What do you really think of him?”

Susan flinched. “Well, I haven’t thought a lot about him, though I must say he has stayed around longer than any guy in recent memory.” Susan sighed. “Okay, to be honest. I think he seems like a very nice guy. When he’s over here, it’s because he’s come to see you, so I don’t really spend a lot of time with him. I’ve cooked a few dinners for you guys, but most of time he comes, you go out, you come back, and you fuck like two wildcats. I’m surprised the neighbors haven’t complained. And he’s usually gone before I’m up in the morning. And lately you’ve been spending much more time at his house than at our apartment…for your love nest activities, that is. I must say that’s easier on me. I get more sleep, and I don’t have to imagine what you and he are doing to each other.”

“That’s it?”

“What else do you want me to say? I’m an English professor, not a social worker. He doesn’t seem abusive. He’s easy to look at. He doesn’t…” Susan paused. “Uh oh. If he’s not wearing on you and yet you’re stewing about him…” She arched an eyebrow. “Jams, maybe you’d better tell me what’s really on your mind.”

Jamie didn’t miss the sudden flash of anxiety that crossed Susan’s face.

About Adriana Kraft

Winner of the 2014 Bisexual Book Award for erotic fiction, author Adriana Kraft is a married couple writing Sizzling Romantic Suspense and Erotic Romance for Two, Three, or More. Whether readers open our romantic suspense or our erotic romance, they can expect characters they care about, hot sex scenes, and a compelling story. Our suspense stories deliver one man, one woman, danger and intrigue. Our erotic romance is edgier and nearly always includes ménage or polyamory, sometimes with two women and a man, sometimes with two (or more) couples.

Together we have published more than forty romance novels and novellas to outstanding reviews. We love hearing from readers at adrianakraft99@yahoo.com, and here is our website: When It’s Time to Heat Things Up http://adrianakraft.com

 

Social Media Links

Blog: http://www.adrianakraft.com/blog

FaceBook Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Adriana-Kraft/182846025133440

Twitter http://twitter.com/AdrianaKraft

GoodReads http://www.goodreads.com/author/list/1578571.Adriana_Kraft

Newsletter http://eepurl.com/uRvCr

Google+ https://plus.google.com/102791537641895264573/posts

BookBub https://www.bookbub.com/authors/adriana-kraft

 

 

Release blitz organized by Writer Marketing Services.

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Author Interview – A.L. Butcher

Here’s my latest author interview – enjoy:)

Mandy Eve-Barnett's Official Blog

Author-Interview-ButtonPlease be aware some of Alex’s novels are 18+ rated.

  1. Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both! I have fibromyalgia so some days I don’t have the energy to do much of any use. I try and write everyday (and don’t always succeed), but some days, if I feel OK I get a total buzz from the writing. It’s satisfying to create something, and the feel-good is worth a lot. On the other hand the non-writing days make me feel a bit rubbish. It does depend on what else I have done that day. I work full time, so writing is usually limited to the evenings, weekends and holidays. I enjoy it though. When it becomes a burden I will stop.

  1. What is your writing Kryptonite?

Gaming and the internet. I am easily distracted. I’ll just go online for half an hour before I write… just 30 minutes…. Who am…

View original post 2,511 more words

Book Spotlight and Blog stop – La Contessa – Erotic Historical Novel

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Out Now—La Contessa by S. Nano #newrelease #erotica #bdsm

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Book Blurb

La Contessa

The most decadent city…

The most perverted mistress…

 

Renowned for her beauty and cruelty, La Contessa’s reputation as a dominatrix is well established. And eighteenth-century Venice has degenerated into a decadent and lascivious city, the perfect backdrop for her to play-out her debauched games and political ambitions.

She sends her maid, Julia, into the alleyways to search for a young man to act as her slave. Julia finds Roberto prostituting himself in the least salubrious district of Venice. He enters into La Contessa’s service to perform her bizarre and sadistic scenes.

From their first meeting, there is a mutual attraction between maid and servant. The young couple engineer a series of sexual encounters, knowing the risks should their mistress discover them. Their situation is complicated when La Contessa rescues Becky and brings her to the palazzo as her submissive girl-slave. The interloper exposes Julia’s jealousies… and the feelings for her mistress.

How long can Roberto and Julia keep their love secret? Will Becky’s presence thwart their relationship? Will La Contessa’s scheming bring her the richest prize in all Venice?

All is resolved before the grand ball and masked, BDSM orgy held by La Contessa in her palazzo as the climax to Venice’s Carnivale.

Buy links

 

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2DLp1aX

 

Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/2nlOuAM

 

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/search?Query=La+contessa

 

Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/la-contessa-s-nano/1127888667?ean=2940158958274

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Author bio

 

  1. Nano is a writer of erotic stories with dark and exotic content in fantasy or historical settings drawing on the themes of female domination, BDSM and fetish but often with a seam of quirky humour running through them.

 

‘La Contessa’ is his third full length novel. ‘Adventures in Fetishland’, a BDSM/fetish re-invention of the classic Alice stories was published by Xcite Books and ‘Mistress of the Air’, a comic, Steampunk, erotic adventure was also published by eXcessica. His novellas and short stories have been published by Xcite Books, House of Erotica, Forbidden Fiction, Coming Together and Greenwoman Publishing.

 

He is a regular participant in reading slams at ‘Smut by the Sea’ and similar events in the UK, contributing a workshop ‘Kinking Up the Past’, on getting inspiration for erotic stories in historical settings, in 2015.

 

Author web site: http://www.slavenano.co.uk/writing

Author facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/nano.vaslen

 

Extract 2: Least Explicit

La Contessa gestures for me to take up a position at the opposite side of her from Becky.

She’s dressed formally, in her wig, a rich embroidered gown, and as much make-up as I’ve seen her wear. She’s dressed to impress, and when I see her guest, I understand why. His gown is grand, its hood lined with ermine. But it’s the cane, capped with a silver winged lion, which provides the vital clue for me. Nobody would openly carry such an iconic symbol if they were not part of Venice’s ruling elite. The ensuing conversation confirms my suspicions.

“May I speak frankly to you, Contessa?”

“Yes, these are my servants. I trust them not to allow any report of our conversation to go beyond this room. They know the severity of the punishment if they do.”

“This is a delicate matter, Contessa. As you know the trade through Venice of late has declined, and the Doge and Council of Ten are, let me be frank, in straightened circumstances.”

“Allessandro Fernasse, I’m perfectly aware the interest on my loans to the Doge is due for payment in a matter of days. No doubt you’ve been sent here to crawl on behalf of the Council of Ten to renegotiate the interest payments. And, knowing the perverse lecher you are, I don’t doubt you’d also like to avail yourself of the entertainments I offer. You will see I have acquired a new slave and slave girl since you were last here. The girl is especially delicious don’t you think… and very willing.”

The corpulent representative of the Council of Ten squirms uncomfortably in his seat, sweat dripping from his forehead. I’m intrigued by this exchange. It explains a lot. Venice is a place where money rules. This must be the hold La Contessa has over the ruling elite of the city, making her untouchable in whatever she does.

“Yes, Contessa, on behalf of the Council I’m here to ask for a rescheduling of our debts.”

La Contessa raises an eyebrow, “Ask? You mean beg, surely.”

“Well, to discuss what mutually beneficial arrangements we might come to,” splutters Fernasse.

“Ha! You mean beg. And yes, I will make you beg! Get out of the chair onto your knees and crawl towards me.”

“But, Contessa, is it your intention to humiliate me?”

“Yes, indeed it is. Do as I say and get on your knees or there will be no negotiation. I will simply insist on the repayment of my loan. You know the consequences.”

Offered no alternative, Fernasse heaves his body out of the chair and gets down on his knees. He crawls the short distance to where La Contessa sits, her hand outstretched ready for him. He takes it in his hand and kisses it. There is a pause.

Yes?” prompts La Contessa.

“Contessa, I beg you on behalf of the Doge and the Council of Ten to extend the period of your loan to the city for six months. We are expecting a fleet of merchant ships to arrive from the Far East by then with goods we can trade. I beg you to grant us this favour.”

“That’s better. And tell the Doge, next time he wants to reschedule his debts, he must come himself, and I will make him get down on his knees and crawl. I am minded to agree to an extension but I do have further conditions; a few trifles to satisfy my whims.”

“Yes, Contessa; let me know what they are. I’m confident we will be able to accommodate them,” said Fernasse, still on his knees.

“The first stipulation is that, on the final day of Carnevale, I will expect my barge to lead the procession along the Grand Canal, and for the ball to be held in my palazzo.”

“Why yes, Contessa, we would be honoured for you to host the Carnevale’s masked ball,” he says, relieved at the relative modesty of the request.

 

 

Release blitz organised by Writer Marketing Services.

Dirty Dozen – Warrior Bundle – Linda Maye Adams – Military

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Author name: Linda Maye Adams

Remembering Warriors is a commemorative Bundle – Why is it important to you to support these causes? The women veterans of wars are often entirely left out of the story.  Worse, they don’t speak up.  I was in a call for veteran’s stories (Red, White & True), and was shocked that I was one of only two women veterans in the entire book.  We need our voices to be heard.

 

Do you have anyone you remember who was wounded or fought in war (either past or present)? I was one of the 40,000 women who served in the first Persian Gulf War, Desert Storm.  But I had one friend who didn’t come home whole from there.  It was hard afterward, watching as she self-destructed bit-by-bit.  The Army taught us how to go to war, but not how to transition back to normal.

*Please tell us about your publications. I’m indie published.  Since the bundle is military-themed, these are some of my publications that focus on the military.

GALCOM Universe series

  • Crying Planet
  • Lonely Planet
  • Watcher Ghost (short story)

Fantasy Novels

  • Rogue God

Speculative Fiction Short Stories

  • Devil Winds
  • Monkey River
  • New Robot Smell
  • Rejected by Aliens
  • Theater Ship

Writing Craft

  • Writer’s Guide to Military Culture

Military

  • Red, White & True
  • Women at War: Stories and Poems – these include poetry written during Desert Storm.

crying planet - cover

What first prompted you to publish your work? I’ve written stories as long as I can remember.  My uncle, Ernie Rydberg, was a writer during the pulp era, and into the 1970s.  I would visit his house in San Diego and see The Writer on his coffee table.  I loved writing stories and having the adventures in the stories, and I always wanted to publish them.  Indie’s a wonderful opportunity to publish stories that the traditional publishers deem as too different.

 What have you found the most challenging part of the process? For Soldier, Storyteller, it was figuring out how to tell this story in a way that was interesting to readers and not doing military babble or “exorcising demons.”  I knew when I came back from Desert Storm that I had a story, but it took 25 years for me to figure out not only how to tell it, but what to tell.  It wasn’t the story I thought 25 years ago, but answering a question that people always asked me: What was it like?

Are you a ‘pantser’ or a ‘plotter’? I’m a pantser.  I’ve had people crossing their eyes when I describe my writing process. I don’t use beats or plan anything at all out.  I don’t even know how the story will end beyond a vague “Good guys win” or “Blow up something.”  I just get an idea and start writing, discovering the story much like a reader discovers the story when they turn the page. It’s a lot of fun following a rabbit hole and finding some really cool that makes the story.

What are your views on authors offering free books? Do you believe, as some do, that it demeans an author and his or her work? Free is too low of a standard, and writers are too eager for validation and accept a low standard.  Years and years ago, I sent stories out to the non-paying markets.  They were easier to get into,  but at a cost.  I did not realize I was subconsciously telling myself I wasn’t good enough to get paid for my writing.  The result was that I never had the incentive to push my craft skills.  Once I started thinking about getting paid professionally, my skills made huge leaps.  I could see what a disservice I did to myself with free when I was invited to write for a non-paying military call from a literary magazine.  They didn’t pay, of course. I had a look a sample story they had posted and immediately passed.  I was already writing above what they were publishing.  My time is important. Free doesn’t respect my time.

Sort these into order of importance:

Good plot

Great characters

Awesome world-building

Technically perfect

This depends on the genre.  If it’s science fiction or fantasy, the awesome world building is at the top of the list because that’s what the readers read for.  If it’s a mystery, great characters come first.  Technically perfect?  Nowhere on my list.  That might please an English teacher, but it doesn’t make for very interesting stories.

How much research do you do for your work? What’s the wildest subject you’ve looked at? For Soldier, Storyteller, I had to research to fill in gaps.  It was hard being a soldier during Desert Storm because we were cut off from the rest of the world!  I did an event timeline of the war and looked up articles in the Tacoma Morning News Tribune about the day my unit left.  I hadn’t remembered it had rained when I left until I saw an article about a storm.  Probably the most shocking thing I found in my research was how close I was to the front line.  We were always told 70 kilometers.  In my head, I translated that was 70 miles.  Nope.  It was 43 miles.  Oh, boy…  I was very glad I didn’t know that at the time.  It made me queasy 25 years later!

 

What’s the worst piece best advice you’ve received about writing/publishing?Outlining.  I was a natural pantser; it was how I started writing.  But I was trying to learn how to be a better writer, and I did not realize that most writing advice assumes outlining.  I picked up so much outlining advice that I broke my writing.

In 2007, I was ready to give up writing novels because they came out so horribly broken that I didn’t even want to show them to other writers for help.  The more broken my writing got, the more advice I read to try to fix what was happening, and the worse the problem got.  I even tried outlining, and the problem got worse.  Other writers were telling me I wasn’t outlining correctly.  I despaired that I would ever be able to write novels.  But I’d been a soldier and it was accomplish the mission.

So I tried writing classes that were popping up everywhere.  I asked, “Are you pantser friendly?” and was told “Yes, we teach both outliners and pantsers.”  Then I’d go to the class and the instructor wouldn’t know what to do with me and often treated me like I was stupid because I wasn’t getting with the program.  Then I ran across Dean Wesley Smith’s site, and his workshops.  I asked him if the workshops were pantser friendly, and he said that was how he wrote.

Whoa!  Someone who wrote like me.

 Tell us about your latest piece? After going to war, I’ve realized I like my adventures safely tucked into a work of fiction, not in real life.  And I write like what I want to read, women having adventures. I currently am writing the third book in a science fiction series that uses my military background but puts a civilian in as the main character.  She travels to different worlds to fix problems with ghosts.  The character is still mystified about how the military works and why no one uses their first names. The book is called Cursed Planet.

 What’s your next writing adventure? You mean I have to pick?  I haven’t decided yet.  I’m from Los Angeles and regularly saw brush fires every year, so I thought that might be a good fit for my ghost science fiction series.  Or I could do an attack on a spaceship and play with how technology both works in unexpected ways and sometimes screws things up.  I’m also thinking about a series set in Hollywood in the 1940s, with Jack Reacher as a woman character.  So many fun ideas, so little time.

Is this the age of the e-book? Are bricks and mortar bookshops in decline? I think that the bookstores are going to have to fundamentally change how they sell books.  Retail has not responded well to all the changes, judging from the number of big companies closing stories, like Macy’s and Sears.  Their default was to expand in either more stores or more diverse products.  Barnes and Noble sells gifts.  Who makes a specific trip to B&N to buy Moleskines or puzzles?  Retail needs to identify what experience they can offer that Amazon can’t, but everyone is still focusing on selling products and not an experience.

Links: http://www.lindamayeadams.com

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Bio:

Linda Maye Adams was probably the least likely person to be in the Army—even the Army thought so!  She was an enlisted soldier and served for twelve years and was one of the women who deployed to Desert Storm.  But she’d much prefer her adventures to be in books.  She is the author of the military-based GALCOM Universe series, including the novels Crying Planet and Lonely Planet.  She’s also received three honorable mentions in the Writers of the Future contest and an honorable mention in Alfred Hitchcock Magazine’s contest.  Linda is a native of Los Angeles, California, and currently lives in Northern Virginia.  Find out more about Linda Maye Adams on her website at http://www.lindamayeadams.com.

https://books2read.com/rememberingwarriors

Learn about Remembering Warriors here

Dirty Dozen and Returning Author Interview – Andrew P. Weston – Sci-Fi

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#Dirtydozen #Meetanauthor #Scifi

Name: Andrew P. Weston

Please tell us about your publications.

My publications have been produced with the guidance and support of the team at Perseid Press and as you will see, I tend to favour themes with a science fiction, fantasy and paranormal bent.

The science fiction slot is filled with the IX Series, detailing the trials and tribulations of the legendary lost 9th Legion of Rome who marched into the mists of Caledonia in circa 100AD and were never seen again. Needless to say, they didn’t just disappear, and the series has grown into something of a gem.

The trilogy is comprised of the following books: The IXExordium of TearsPrelude of Sorrow. (Just released, get it while it’s piping hot!)

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The fantasy paranormal niche is nicely filled by the exploits of Satan’s Reaper, Daemon Grim. His adventures are told through a series of anthologies and full novels incorporated within Janet Morris’ critically acclaimed Heroes in Hell universe.
The novels are: Hell BoundHell Hounds – (and Hell Gate out in the Fall of 2018 – stay tuned).

The anthologies that leapfrog the novels are: Grim – Doctors in Hell, Pieces of Hate – Pirates in Hell, and later this year, Devil’s Trull – Lovers in Hell.)
If you want to stay with the flow of Daemon Grim’s evolution, it would be best to start with Doctors in Hell, and then go on to Hell Bound; Pirates in Hell, followed by Hell Hounds. Do you see? Each of the anthology pieces is a complete short story in itself, but it also adds substance to Grim’s overall adventure.

What first prompted you to publish your work?

The challenge! There’s a well-known maxim that states we all have a book inside us. But how many actually sit down and do it? How many dedicate themselves to the uphill marathon of putting all those thoughts and ideas into a coherent mass, from which you have to pick out the nuts and bolts of an organized tale that grips and entertains? I nearly gave up a good half dozen times on my first book. But I’m glad I persisted … because now I can’t seem to stop.

What have you found the most challenging part of the process?

Now I’m progressing? Being too picky. When I write the first draft and complete my running edits, I’m paranoid about not repeating the mistakes I made in my first few manuscripts of overusing certain ‘descriptive’ words or expressions.

I can’t help it. I’m a bit of a perfectionist, which makes me my own worst enemy when it comes to relaxing and letting things roll naturally. (The amount of hair pulling and fist clenching that goes on in my house would entertain the most avid WWE fan).

However, I’m addressing that particular challenge and hope to grow my hair back soon.

Are you a ‘pantser’ or a ‘plotter’?

I think it’s true to say I plot by the seat of my pants!

My readers will know I do plan things out rather meticulously before I start writing, especially during the world building stage. The same goes when it comes to the story arc. I like to chart the course I intend to follow so I can prepare sub-plots and mini-arcs along the way. You know, those little side-stories that keep the reader engrossed. However, I’ve learned NOT to stick rigidly to plan. Some of my best, most heartrending scenes came to me ‘mid-type.’ And when I went with those spur-of-the-moment ideas and allowed them to expand until they were interwoven into my concept…? Well, I think my stories have been enriched in every case. (Mac McDonald’s death in The IX being one such panster moment. Originally, he wasn’t destined to die, you see J ).

How influential is storytelling to our culture?

Nowhere near as influential as it should be.

I was very fortunate growing up, my mother would read to me every night before bed, and my father was always making weird and wonderful tales up with which to regale me. Whether it was written or no, I remember how I lived what I was listening to, imagining in my head what the monsters looked like, the creatures in the forests, the undersea caves full of treasure, etc. Storytelling stimulates the mind – in both the speaker and listener – and encourages a world of fantasy in ways mobile phones and iPods never will.

Which authors have influenced you the most?

Stephen Donaldson: for his use of descriptive prose. (and a darn good story-arc).

Tad Williams: for writing in a way that involves you in the most incredulous adventures as if they really could be a part of everyday life.

Neil Gaiman: Because it’s Neil Gaiman and I don’t think there’s a topic in existence he can’t turn into a weirdly, wonderful marvel that will hold you spellbound to the end.

Edgar Allen Poe: He inspired me to bear my dark soul in poetry, and damned the consequences.

What is your writing space like?

Think of what a gaily decorated and fully-laden Christmas Tree looks like after playful kittens high on catnip have been let loose on it for a while, and you won’t go far wrong.

Tell us about your latest piece?

I’m just concluding the Author’s Cut edition of Kiss of the Succubus, book 2 of the Cambion Journals. This particular series is being completed in tandem with the first Guardians trilogy. Both were debut works I completed as I broke into the business and I’m ensuring to give them the attention they deserve. I can’t wait for readers to meet these characters – especially Augustus Thorne. (You’ll see, ladies. You’ll see.)

What’s your next writing adventure?

I’m still thinking about it. Once the Author’s cut versions of the Guardian Series and Cambion Journals are out the way, I have the foundations in place for several projects: Something from the IX world – most likely a prequel; the completion of the second trilogy from the Guardians universe; new adventures within the Cambion multiverse; the further exploits of Daemon Grim; and a brand new untitled project set in a dystopian future.
I know…so much to do, so little time, and only one pair of hands!

What is the last book you’ve read?

The Artisans of Albia trilogy by Cas Peace. (It comes as one book you see…a cunning ploy) I really do recommend it. It’s great fun to read and will definitely pique your interest in the follow-ups. (I know I’ll be reading them)

Is this the age of the e-book? Are bricks and mortar bookshops in decline?

No. True readers love real books too much. The smell and atmosphere in a bookshop can’t be replaced. This subject reminds me of a wonderful little one-liner the actor Stephen Fry said to an interviewer who asked him a similar question. His reply ran along the lines of…”Books are no more threatened by Kindle than stairs by elevators.”

Isn’t that awesome? And it makes a powerful point, doesn’t it?
Yes, I enjoy ebooks and the ease by which you can buy them online. But buying and reading them that way will never usurp actually holding the real deal in your hands and feeling its cover, the texture of the page, the smell of the printing process and the ambience of a shop. Heaven.

Is there a message in your books?
Always. The thing is, spotting them.

Some are tongue-in-cheek. From the very beginning, I’ve sprinkled cross-references to my other works in each novel. Little phrases here and there. A name, a title, a term of endearment or address. (Here’s a good one – when The Rage of Augustus, Book 1 of the Cambion Series becomes available, see if you can spot a direct nod toward ME – Andrew P. Weston, author). I’m there if you look carefully. And no, I’m not talking about my name on the cover. J

Apart from that, I do like to include some form of real-world moral or ethical dilemma within my story arcs that helps the reader appreciate, “What if?” What would I do if I faced that predicament? Would I be as restrained? That strong? That determined? Or would I simply take the easy course and go with the flow?
Again, they are there if you look, and each of them are specific to the story arc in question.

Links:

Links to Prelude to Sorrow

Amazon UK

Amazon

Website: http://www.andrewpweston.com/

Blog: http://andrewpweston.blogspot.gr/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WestonAndrew

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrewpaul.weston

IXPRELUDEFINALinstallment

 

Bio:
Andrew P. Weston is Royal Marine and Police veteran from the UK who now lives on the beautiful Greek island of Kos with his wife, Annette, and their growing family of rescue cats.

An astronomy and criminal law graduate, he is the creator of the internationally acclaimed IX Series and Hell Bound & Hell Hounds (novels forming part of Janet Morris’ Heroes in Hell shared universe). Andrew also has the privilege of being a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the British Fantasy Society, the British Science Fiction Association and the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers.

When not writing, Andrew devotes some of his spare time to assisting NASA with one of their remote research projects, and writes educational articles for Astronaut.com and Amazing Stories.

 

Book Spotlight – Prelude to Sorrow – Sci-fi

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Title: Prelude to Sorrow

Author: Andrew p. Weston

Genre: Science Fiction

Main character descriptions:
Marcus Brutus. General of the 9th Legion and Field Marshal of the combined taskforce.
Samuel Pell. Captain, Royal Marines and commander of the Special Forces contingent.
Jake Rixton. Captain, U.S. Cavalry. OIC of the mounted brigade.
Gul Shaní:  Deputy Magister of the Senatum of Arden.
Psi Calen: Chief Scientific Advisor of the Senatum of Arden.
Va-ákil: Supreme Magnate of the Kresh (Horde).
Altás: Prime Catalyct – Battlemaster – of the Primus Host of the Kresh.
James Houston. Turncoat and murderer. Onetime officer-in-command of the 5th Company, 2nd Mounted Rifles. Now a Horde changeling.

Synopsis:

The task force dispatched from Arden to eradicate the Horde menace failed, and for those few left alive, the tenet by which they have survived for so long resounds as never before.

Fight or Die!

Now marooned, out of time and out of place, the survivors lick their wounds and struggle to recover while the Horde gathers their strength for a final strike that will change the course of history forever. The fate of the galaxy – and more – hangs in the balance.

But fate, it seems, isn’t done with the Ninth, and our heroes find themselves forced to mount a last-ditch attempt to end the threat once and for all.

Will the darkness be vanquished, or will our heroes’ efforts finally signal the beginning of the end of their adventure?

 

Brief Excerpt 250 words:

A deafening cry split the heavens and boomed across the savannah. He looked up and saw what could only be a huge bird in the sky, roaring a challenge that twisted the fabric of everything he held dear and caused every other living creature lurking around the watercourse—both friend and foe—to flee in mutual panic.

Instinct took over, and the entire clan stampeded back through the reeds in a mad dash toward the welcoming protection of the jungle.

The alpha risked a quick glance over his shoulder at their nemesis.

Wings as voluminous as clouds and pregnant with fulgurous discharges blotted out the sun. A monstrous beak and unbelievably large talons blazed like a furnace, searing his eyes and baking the ground where they passed.

Morbid dread froze his heart, and as he watched, the awful thing belched fire and cleaved in two. While the bulk of its mass fell on prey to the northeast, the vehemence of its thermogenic gaze continued on toward his troop, shrieking of death and retribution.

He screeched, and the tribe increased its pace.

Moments later, he could hear his family crashing into the undergrowth. He had no doubt they’d be paying scant heed to the thorns scratching at their faces or the twigs yanking out divots of hair.

Safe now?

His concerns were timely.

Thunder pealed and the ground shook. A sweltering exhalation swept by, igniting leaves, bushes, trees, and exposed fur alike.

 

Why should readers buy this book?
The story of the “Lost” 9th legion of Rome has been a matter of conjecture for centuries, as well as the subject of countless works and two major Hollywood films. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if the truth of their disappearance was explained here, in all its bitter glory?

 

IXPreludeSorrowLargeAdvert - Copy

 

Links:
Website: http://www.andrewpweston.com/

Blog: http://andrewpweston.blogspot.gr/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/WestonAndrew

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrewpaul.weston

Book Links

Amazon

Amazon UK

 

Bio:
Andrew P. Weston is Royal Marine and Police veteran from the UK who now lives on the beautiful Greek island of Kos with his wife, Annette, and their growing family of rescue cats.

An astronomy and criminal law graduate, he is the creator of the internationally acclaimed IX Series and Hell Bound & Hell Hounds (novels forming part of Janet Morris’ Heroes in Hell shared universe). Andrew also has the privilege of being a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the British Fantasy Society, the British Science Fiction Association and the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers.

When not writing, Andrew devotes some of his spare time to assisting NASA with one of their remote research projects, and writes educational articles for Astronaut.com and Amazing Stories.

 

Immortals Promo Reblog

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Immortals boxsetvia Curse, Blessing, or a Dance Out of Time? Immortals by A. L. Butcher @libraryoferana + others! #fantasy #SFF #FridayReads

Book Spotlight – Dream Dancer – Janet & Chris Morris – Scifi/Post Apocalyptic

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Dream Dancer

Title: Dream Dancer

Authors: Janet and Chris Morris

Genre: Science Fiction/Post-Apocalyptic

Synopsis:

Everything you’ve seen or read till now took you only to the brink . . .

Neither pure fantasy, nor straight science fiction, nor earthbound dynastic saga, Dream Dancer is a stunning amalgam of all three. It is a family saga with the epic appeal of Dune and the action and excitement of Star Wars. It is a saga of love, power and treachery that will appeal to men and women equally; full of action, compulsively readable and quite unlike anything being published in the realms of fantasy today.

The heroine, Shebat, is a remarkable girl from Earth. She is brought to the vast empire of the Kerrion family by a renegade son; named as its future ruler on a whim of his autocratic father; abducted to the slums where the Kerrions’ slaves drug themselves with powerful mystical sorcery; and finally rescued to take part in a great rebellion. She falls in love with one brother but marries another and becomes more Kerrion than some born to the name. A magical seductress of men, passionate in her lust for power, Shebat moves among those who control the destinies of millions, for whom treachery and betrayal are as easy as murder.

Set in the timeless future on a primitive, savage Earth and on the sophisticated habitats of deep space, Dream Dancer is the first volume of a three-part saga.

Why should readers buy this book (50 words max)?

‘Neither pure fantasy, nor straight science fiction, nor earthbound dynastic saga, Dream Dancer is a stunning amalgam of all three. It is a family saga with the epic appeal of Dune and the action and excitement of Star Wars.’

Links etc.

Universal Link https://books2read.com/DreamdancerJMCM

You can learn about Janet Morris here:

Janet Morris on Wiki

Blog/Website

http://www.theperseidpress.com/

https://sacredbander.com/

Twitter

https://twitter.com/uvmchristine

https://twitter.com/uvmchristine/media

Writer Wednesdays – Tips for New Writers – revisited

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This is a little cheeky as some of was taken from an old post (2013) – but have I changed my views? The origin post was written not that long after I started self-publishing.

So let’s revisit my old post – Old in RED, new comments in black.

Link to original post

Share your most helpful writing tips and advice. What do you know now that you wished you had known when you started writing?

New writers are given an awful lot of information, much of it contradictory and it is very difficult to know the good advice from the bad. Experience is a great teacher!

Yep – it’s still true there is information overload. There is some great advice, and some lousy advice. Working out which is which can be a challenge. Indie authors, in my experience, support each other, offer advice and suggestions and understand the challenges. Listen to the advice, good and bad. After all if it hasn’t worked for one person that doesn’t mean it won’t work for you. The bloody awful advice will become self-apparent.  Free advice is always worth taking in. What you choose to do with it, that’s up to you.

Here are my top 6 tips:

1)    Keep writing. This is seems to be consistent advice from all the sources I have seen. A single book is great but it is hard to build a fan base with just one title and if readers like your work they may well look out for other articles and stories. I do as a reader. As your writing experience grows you will learn what works and what doesn’t. Write for anthologies, write for your blog or someone else’s or write for research. Yahoo Voices have many interesting blog-type articles and it is a way to build a fan base. Researching for your novel? Great, use that research to help others. There are lots of anthologies looking for submissions (see links below) and some pay, although some don’t. Even the free ones are useful in getting your name out there and are writing practice.

Yahoo Voices no longer exists, but there are thousands of blogs/e-zines and groups who will happily take guest posts. Writing for anthologies – yes, I’d say it was helpful but as you get more experienced then you can pick and choose. The first few I did didn’t pay – and that’s a good way to promote yourself initially – but of course, most authors want paying for their work. Free has its place – don’t get me wrong – but it’s good to be able to pick and choose. There is also the consideration – anthology stories are varied in quality, length and style. Try and read some of the other stories, if that’s possible, or check out the author’s work. I’ve read (and been in) anthos where some of the stories need….more work. Make sure your own entry is good, well presented and not riddled with errors. 

Research – yes, yes, yes. Post up on your blog, or share on forums.

2)    Have a thick skinyou will need it. There will ALWAYS be someone who doesn’t like your book, will be offended by it, hate the characters or simply not get it. We do not all like the same things, if we did the world would be boring indeed.  Bad reviews hurt, but most books have at least one and unless the reviewer has a personal issue with the author (which occasionally happens) then it is one opinion. Reviews are just that – opinions, which can be as varied as the books they discuss.

Still agree with this. You can’t please all of the people all of the time. Shit happens. If you don’t want bad reviews – don’t publish. That said they can be helpful. Every writer thinks his or her work is the best thing ever. Usually it’s not (sorry – and I include myself in that). There is always something which doesn’t quite work, or could have been better – but that is generally true of life. And what that is depends on perspective. I like great world and character building, for example. I’ve read books with awesome reviews only to put them aside after three or four chapters because I didn’t give a damn about the characters. It’s a matter of opinion.

No writer likes to be told their book sucks and it can be hard to deal with. One of the best pieces of advice is ‘don’t comment’, or if you feel you must then be polite, thank the reviewer for their comments and move on. Commenting, especially negatively will do far more harm, go and rant to your best friend, yell at the wall, go for a walk and release that is one person’s opinion only. The next reviewer may love the book. Even negative reviews, except the spiteful ones, have useful advice.

Don’t comment on reviews. Really. Not ever. Don’t bitch, tell the reader they are wrong, or slag them off on social media. Just don’t. That will do your brand FAR more damage than a bad review.

It is hard to work out how much store readers put on reviews, many do look and most simply filter out those which either say nothing or the obviously spiteful or overly gushing ones, but in a couple of studies I have done reviews are surprisingly low on the scale. A good cover, a synopsis which pulls in the reader and recommendations from friends seem more important. If the book is selling don’t worry too much.

Agreed – to an extent. Personally, I don’t put that much store by book reviews – but I do write them. I’m odd like that. Partly I write them because I have a terrible memory and it’s a way to remind me of a book, but also because I like talking about books. People review for many, many reasons and in many many ways. All of them are right.

3)    Write the book you want to write. Now I am sure other writers might disagree with this tip but not all. Forcing a story to work, editing out important plot ideas or making characters do something they wouldn’t do may well make the story weaker. Write the book YOU want to read. Would you enjoy it? If the answer is yes then go with it. A forced plot will show itself to be just that.  It may depend on whether you are intending to self-publish or whether you are intending to submit to a publishing house of course and whether you intend to get an editor.

I’d rephrase this as write the book you want to READ. 

4)    Write the best book you can. No book is perfect. Even bestsellers have typos which slip through, weak plots or naff characters. However, if you are an indie the threshold seems to be higher…there are plenty of posts and threads berating indie self-published books as being substandard. In some cases this is true, we have all seen them but there are very many books which are great, yes some may be a little rough around the edges but the good stories and talent are out there. There are plenty of traditionally published books which are awful. That said releasing a book full of typos, terrible grammar and weak plot/characters is not advisable. Spellcheckers are useful but invest in a dictionary, a thesaurus and a writing guide. If you can find beta readers or critique groups then do so.

If you can afford an editor, then get one. Ask around, there are various authors who edit, or know them. I found a couple of free/cheap online writing courses. Write, write, write. 

If you decide to self-edit then put the manuscript aside for a while and write (or read) something new. You will see the work with fresher eyes. I know from experience I see what I think is there not what IS there. If you can afford an editor then it is advisable to consider it, but there are great books which have been self-edited. If you choose this route be thorough, it may take several passes through. Although earlier I said write the book YOU want you do need to be strict when editing. It is easy to get carried away and go off on a tangent. Does the scene add to the story/characterisation/world-building? No – then lose it.

5)    Research and plausibility. This is rather dependent on genre of course but willing suspension of disbelief only goes so far. Fantasy gives a lot of scope, especially magic but it still needs to be consistent. Research gives the writer credibility, if you say something works which we KNOW doesn’t work in that way then at the least back it up in the story with some plausibility, or better still find something which people know does work that way. Gravity is gravity. Research medieval battle, weapons and armour, field medicine, herb-lore and such like if you are planning a fight. Movie fight scenes look great visually but aren’t really that accurate. What damage DOES a long sword do? What IS the range of a longbow. You needn’t go into too much detail in the book, but knowing if your archer can hit that bad-guy lurking in the Dark-lord’s tower is helpful. Books can educate, and encourage people to research for themselves, especially if set in a certain time period but accuracy is the key. Of course, many readers won’t go on to research or have any interest in the origins of the longbow, the war horse but some might. Besides research is great, it is amazing what you can discover!

Yep, pretty much. I spent a while looking up ancient Greek curses the other day, and I’ve researched flora and fauna, weaponry and armour, the potential airworthiness of dragons, whether salamandars are edible, poisons and herblore, giantism and all sorts of other things.

6)    READ THE DAMN MANUAL! Really I mean it. Spend a bit of time not only reading writing guides but the FAQ of KDP, Smashwords, Lulu or wherever it is you choose to publish. It will make life a lot easier. There are several free books available – ‘Publish your work on Kindle’, ‘How to Publish on Smashwords’ for example. Most of the sites have extensive guidelines and forums. That is another thing most people have struggled with whatever it is you are struggling with so search the forums for answers. You are now a business person as well as a writer and it helps to know what to do.

What do I wish I had known at the beginning? Marketing is HARD. Where is the line between being a spammy needy author and promoting in such a way that people will check out your books and not be annoyed? Well that depends on who you ask…some people hate any mention of the product, some don’t mind a small amount and some say as much as you can do is the way to go. If I find the right level I will let you know.

World Building:

http://audenstreasury.blogspot.co.uk/p/writing-fight-scenes-resources.html?showComment=1369324942695

http://cbmccullough.wordpress.com/2013/04/30/domesticating/

http://mythicscribes.com/world-building/adding-depth-to-a-fantasy-world/

http://audenstreasury.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/dark-fantasy-world-building-names.html

http://profantasy.com/

Writing generally:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/9764931/The-101-best-pieces-of-advice-ever-received.html

http://robbgrindstaff.com/2013/01/why-are-verbs-so-tense/

http://lissywrites.com/2013/06/28/back-cover-text-book-blurbs-and-other-fun-stuff/

http://venturegalleries.com/blog/writing-short-stories-for-anthologies/

http://www.writingforward.com/writing-tips/tips-for-self-editing?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tips-for-self-editing

http://www.indiesunlimited.com/2013/07/13/rethink-advice-to-writers/#more-41613

Writers Digest

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